Sean Carollo ’07 writes

My point was simply that diversity and oportunity are often phrased on this campus as “steping out of one’s comfort zone”; the problem with the juncture of this idea and, I will even be civil and call it by its correct name, cluster housing, is that for a portion of those who reside on this campus and supposedly form some part of the community that is so valued, cluster housing will remove ANY comfort zone. I said this at the first forum on this matter and I will continue to say it: I can only reach outside my comfort zone if I am allowed to have one. Living amongst strangers and persons who, perhaps for reasons they are not aware of, seem hostile, leaves one with no energy for any activity, social, academic or otherwise.

Again, is there a single Odd Quad alum who believes that social life at Williams for her and her Odd Quad friends would have been better with cluster housing? I don’t think so.

By the way, has anyone reached out to my classmate, Professor Katie Kent ’88 on this topic? If memory serves, she was in Dodd, but she certainly knew many Odd Quaders and was a passionate defender of many of the causes of that era. Does she think that Odd Quad Ephs then would have been better off with cluster* housing? Does she think that they would be now?

Probably not.

*Note that, in the 80’s, Williams did have affiliated houses, but the Odd Quad retained a special character because only Odd Quaders, for the most part, sought to live there.

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