Why does tuition keep going up? There are many reasons. But stupid government mandates certainly don’t help.

On November 4, 2005, Governor Mitt Romney signed new legislation called “Nicole’s Law” to protect the public from the dangers of carbon monoxide, a potentially lethal odorless gas. This law and the resulting regulation require Williams College to install detectors in all of our residences with potential sources of carbon monoxide.

Although every death is a tragedy, there is no reasonable cost/benefit calculation which would mandate such devices at a place like Williams. Who pushes these laws through the legislator? Nanny-staters, attention-seeking politicians and the makers/installers of these devices. Full announcement below.

On November 4, 2005, Governor Mitt Romney signed new legislation called “Nicole’s Law” to protect the public from the dangers of carbon monoxide, a potentially lethal odorless gas. This law and the resulting regulation require Williams College to install detectors in all of our residences with potential sources of carbon monoxide.

The new regulations require carbon monoxide detectors on every level of our residence halls including habitable portions of basements and attics. On levels with sleeping areas the detectors must be placed within ten feet of the bedroom doors. We will start installing the battery-powered carbon monoxide detectors in every building this week.

The detector will emit an audible alarm when dangerous carbon monoxide concentrations are detected. All Nighthawk carbon monoxide detectors incorporate Time Weighted Averaging,” meaning the alarm is based on the amount of carbon monoxide as well as the total time the carbon monoxide has been present. The higher the carbon monoxide concentration, the quicker the alarm will sound.

The most common symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are flu-like symptoms, slight headaches, nausea, vomiting and fatigue. With moderate exposure you might experience a throbbing headache, drowsiness, confusion, and a fast heart rate.

The carbon monoxide detectors are not connected to the fire alarm system so should the detector activate in your building, immediately call Campus Safety and Security at X4444 so they can check the carbon monoxide levels in the building. The carbon monoxide detectors are considered fire safety equipment and should not be tampered with.

Joe Moran
Manager of Environmental Health & Safety
Williams College
60 Latham Street
Williamstown, MA 01267

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