Alums and other Ephblog readers: this one will probably be Greek to you. Sorry.

Here are a few tips for using the Williams webmail system:

  1. Expand beyond your inbox. You can add additional folders beyond the Inbox, Drafts, Sent, and Trash folders. My additional folders include one for the Daily Messages, one for Ephblog comment notifications, one for Outling Club messages, and more for other groups. You can put messages into these folders using…
  2. Message Filters. For example, I have my filters set to send anything with “Daily Messages” in the title to the folder I made for them. You can also automatically forward messages from certain people to another e-mail address as well. You do this by….
  3. Changing your options. Options are found on the top right of webmail, next to “Help” and “Sign Out.” Under “personal,” you can change the name that appears in the “From” field, so that I know that Meredith Kineid is sending me an e-mail, and not mok3@williams.edu. Message filters are under mail. Some other options to change:
  4. More messages per page. Under Settings > Display; mine is set for 50. You also want to enable the message pane but disable HTML.
  5. Save original messages under your reply. Otherwise, I’m not sure what question of mine you’re responding to, especially if its been a few days. Under Composing > Format > Reply.
  6. If you want, forward all messages to another account. Under forwarding. I prefer not to, but plenty of friends put everything on Gmail.
  7. Use the search. Webmail search is fast and easy to use – it’s my quickest way of finding old messages. (I save everything, so I need search to look through all 7999 messages in my inbox or >2000 messages in the folders.)

And lastly, if you don’t have time to reply to e-mails, don’t open them. Otherwise, you forget to reply because of the volume of messages you get, and whoever sent you the message is left in the dark. I can’t count how many times I’ve gotten an e-mail reply only when I randomly bump into someone. The counterpoint of this is that if no one replies to your e-mail, don’t be surprised.

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