- EphBlog - http://ephblog.com -

A look inside Manzanar …

The actuality of Manzanar as recorded by four photographers, Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, Toyo Miyatake, and Clem Albers; has been published as Elusive Truth by Gerald H Robinson with an introduction by Archie Miyatake, Published by Carl Mautz Publishing, 2002, rev 2008.

Continuing the discussions in the inserts in the comments to the post Executive Order 9066, the views of reality are what the photographer chooses to see.

See some for yourself in the listing of 91 photos here (scroll down to the section) http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/manz/hrst.htm and read more about the book here http://www.boredfeet.com/singles2/elusivetruth.php

Facebooktwitter
Comments Disabled (Open | Close)

Comments Disabled To "A look inside Manzanar …"

#1 Comment By Ronit On February 21, 2010 @ 3:51 am

Thanks for the link – the collection of photos is quite extraordinary

#2 Comment By Jr. Mom On February 22, 2010 @ 1:05 am

Ken,

It seems as if Manzanar would not be far from Deep Springs College.

And yes, the photos are amazing. In fact, the site is great exploring, Dick.

#3 Comment By kthomas On February 22, 2010 @ 1:50 am

@Jr. Mom:

Yes– it is very close and (occasionally) visited. I recognized those mountains immediately, though I more often saw them, from the other side.

The plaque that you pointed to, was not the one with which I am acquainted.

Inyo, as I recall, is the largest county in California– somewhat larger than MA, RI, CT (and probably NH/VT)– with the smallest population– around 20,000.

Julian Steward wrote, from the journals of the first explorers, that both Owens, and Deep Springs Valleys, were full of grass as high as the heads of men, when they were found.

Within a decade, they were deserts.

Ah Julian– I’m afraid I’ve always found his model, of what it was to be a scholar, more compelling than the current fad.

#4 Comment By Jr. Mom On February 22, 2010 @ 12:05 pm

Julian Steward wrote, from the journals of the first explorers, that both Owens, and Deep Springs Valleys, were full of grass as high as the heads of men, when they were found.

This reminds me of one of my all-time favorite books, Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose.

It’s the story of the Lewis and Clark expedition, and much of Lewis’s journal and drawings (of all the strange new flora and fauna, and native americans, etc.) are included. The whole journey was such a leap of faith. I remember Lewis describing how all the wildlife (bears included) that have since moved into the mountains, at that time, lived in the open valleys. And coming upon the wonder of Yellowstone. Hmmm, might be worth another read, that book.