The Wall Street Journal “Hire Education” blog has an interesting item from Allyson Moore, career center director at a certain 7th-ranked college halfway across the state. She recounts a story from one of her students that should sound familiar to many Ephs:

Vincent DiForte, an Amherst College senior majoring in psychology, recently did so in an interview with a consulting firm. During the interview, Vincent talked about the analytical, problem-solving, and reading and writing skills he had honed through his liberal-arts education.

“I think that allowed the interviewer to see that I would be able to adapt and be successful in any working environment,” said Vincent, who received a job offer from the firm. “I think they were looking for someone who would be able to take on a larger role, and more and more responsibilities. The broad education I’ve received afforded me the ability to be viewed in that way.”

But is it really true, as she adds, that “Too often, liberal-arts students fail to recognize the value of their own education”? I hope not — if it is, then students are failing to get something important that liberal arts study should impart…

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