This looks really cool:  a The Washington Post reports on the MedCottage, or “Granny Pod,” a “portable high-tech dwelling that could be trucked to a family’s back yard and used to shelter a loved one in need of special care… The dwelling would take up about as much room as a large shed and, like an RV, could connect to a single-family house’s electrical and water supplies. It could be leased for about $2,000 a month.”

A pop-up hospice unit for your baby-boomer parents to end their lives in your backyard? Better think about selling that nursing home stock. Below the fold: picture, controversy, and a stretch for a Williams connection.

Keeps your family together, improves end-of-life quality, potentially saves money on health care, reduces traffic (okay, that’s a stretch). What’s not to like? Oh – it goes on the outside of your house. Paging Captain Neighborhood Association, and his elected representatives:

“Is it a good idea to throw people into a storage container and put them in your back yard?” said Fairfax County Supervisor Jeff C. McKay (D-Lee). “This is the granny pod. What’s next? The college dropout pod?”

“This basically sets up an opportunity to do something legally which prior to this, had been illegal — which is to set up a second residence on a single-family property. It turns our zoning ordinance
upside down,” McKay said.

And a quick Eph link: this puts McKay on the opposite side of the issue from State Senator Chap Petersen ’90, (whose blog appears in Eph Planet). Petersen was among those voting “yea” to pass legislation explicitly overriding local zoning laws that would prohibit the shelters. Petersen and McKay represent different parts of Fairfax County, however.

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