“CHAPTER ONE: INTO THE GARDEN” PLEASE SEE NOTES BELOW.

Another film day and night. Another (mostly) quiet voyage.

Quick viewing notes:
Best seen if you click on the embed/image below, then on “Full Screen” in the top left of the window that pops up after that, and then press F11 for actual Full Screen.  (This page will, unfortunately, loop back through the start.) You probably wish to use the your right and left arrows to move through sequences which do not interest you quickly.


This is one of nine chapters. Due to limits in Picasa, chapters must be presented separately. Other chapters:
Chapter 1. Chapter 2. Chapter 3. Chapter 4. Chapter 5. Chapter 6. Chapter 7. Chapter 8. Chapter 9.


Approx. 2400 frame slideshow film, shot @ .8333fps in 6-frame bursts; enhanced and edited.

Presented inPicassa. Approx. run time: 120 minutes (at default settings; set to 3sec per frame).


Description/Notes: Many Easter Eggs and human stories. Special prize awarded to any non-European alum who can identify more than 75% of Williams alums pictured here and there.


Further notes: Viewer can adjust playback speed from .10-1 fps, use forward/back keys to skip, use other means to skip or rearrange.
Best viewed on a laptop or other device where the viewer can turn the screen, or learn to turn their head.


This may interest:
Those who would like to take a look at Prague;
those with a particularly obsessive interest in space, detail, or the Czech Lands;
those who have not seen the area in 10 years or so;
those who have never had the time or opportunity to look hard.

&Further further notes: Viewer may need to mutter odd witchcraft to use keyboard controls. Picasa does not allow all kinds of things from this kind of embed.


With thanks to Martin, Mitchell and Karen for their organizational and help; to the Prague Museum for their assistance; to all the Williams alums for their conversation and company; thanks to Pluto (the black lab) for walking me up that big hill; and apologies to the viewer for no interior shots of the Muller/Loos house (by request of the Prague Museum).

Facebooktwitter
Print  •  Email