Via our friends at Williams twitter, this amazing article by Andrea Park ’10:

On August 3, 2014, I woke up in a hospital bed somewhere in San Francisco with a catheter and tubes snaking down my throat and up my nose.

I looked at my hands and noticed an IV stuck in my left forearm. The left side of my head throbbed in pain. As I attempted to sit up and understand where I was, a nurse saw that I was awake and ran over.

“Do you want your mother?” she asked. I tried to speak and choked on my breathing tube; I nodded. Soon, my mom rushed in and took my hand. She asked me if I remembered the accident.

I remembered walking down the aisle at my friend’s wedding in Sonoma, the sun beating down so hard on the ceremony that a groomsman got burned standing at the altar. I remembered giving a speech about how my friend always thought she could do better, except when it came to her husband.

I remembered going out with the wedding party in San Francisco to celebrate. We crashed an Indian wedding at the Fairmont Hotel and then guzzled down scorpion bowls full of pink tropical punch at the hotel bar. But that’s where the memories jolted to an end.

I shook my head no.

My mother explained that I had been involved in a hit-and-run car accident after a drunk driver rear-ended my cab.

The force of the impact threw me forward and I hit my head against the armrest in the front, causing my brain to bleed internally. Later, the two groomsmen who rode the cab with me told me that after hitting my head, I had mumbled, “It’s going to be okay,” before slumping over in my seat.

The official diagnosis was an acute subdural hematoma with subfalcine herniation, a traumatic brain injury.

Read the whole thing. This is the best Eph essay I have seen in 2017. The Williams Magazine should seek to re-publish it, perhaps with added details about how Park’s Eph friends helped during her recovery.

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