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100 Days : Walls are going up …

… certainly between people. Walls of separation and isolation from realities as palpable as any built from steel or stone or cement.

Actual walls can be beautifully decorated with murals and enjoyed. These are bearing and supportive walls for structures. Walls built to divide and contain are not beautiful. And decor applied to them is more likely graffiti.

Menschenkette

 

Berlin Wall with Keith Haring 330 ft graffiti 1986. Soon both were gone.

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March Safety Dance Hearing

Latest update on Safety Dance:

Electronic Clerk’s Notes for proceedings held before Judge Michael A. Ponsor: Motion Hearing held on 3/28/2017 re [29] MOTION for Reconsideration filed by Williams College, [31] MOTION to Dismiss for Failure to State a Claim filed by Williams College, [4] First MOTION for Preliminary Injunction John Doe v. Williams College filed by John Doe. Arguments heard. Court denies Motion for Reconsideration, denies Motion for Preliminary Injunction. Court takes Defendant’s Motion to Dismiss under advisement. Orders to issue. (Court Reporter: Sarah Mubarek, Philbin & Associates, 413-733-4078) (Attorneys present: Rossi, Lapp, Kelly) (Healy, Bethaney)

Can anyone interpret this?

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The Alumni Fund needs YOU!

Hello Seniors!
 
Thank you to all of you who have already made your class gift! We’re getting closer to our goal every day.  The class of 2012 had 80% participation their senior year, so let’s blow them out of the water.  
 
This is a reminder that if there is any person, place, or thing that has supported you in your time at Williams that you would like to thank, you can do so by making a dedication alongside your gift, which will appear in the Ivy Exercises Program during graduation weekend.  The Ivy Exercises deadline is May 12.  If you have already made a gift and would like to add a dedication for the Ivy Exercises program, please email shc1@williams.edu with your name and dedication.
 
With the May 12 deadline in mind, we are setting a goal of 130 donors by May 12.   No gift is too small so come out for your class and help us have the highest participation ever!  If we reach this goal, the Alumni Fund will sponsor an Ice Cream Social during Senior week for us! Speaking of Senior Week, did you know that the whole week is free because of gracious Alumni Fund donors who came before us? Thank you Alumni Fund!
 
Make your gift here – Give2.williams.edu (it’s mobile friendly!)
Thank you in advance!
’17 Class Agent Team
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Thriving at Williams: Thursday, 11:30 am – 2 pm, Paresky

Hello Williams,

We invite you to join us Thursday during lunchtime in Paresky for an event about self-care and thriving at Williams. It will be an opportunity to learn about mental health resources and provide input about how to improve these resources.

The Gargoyle Society and Mental Health Committee have partnered with multiple departments (Psych Services, the Chaplains Office, the Athletics Department, and the Alumni Office) and student groups (College Council, Peer Health) to co-create this event to understand and promote student wellbeing. The event includes a workshop series based on the four aspects of the College’s model of thriving: heart, mind, body, and spirit. The event will be comprised of activities, small group discussions, and giveaways that are meant to help us develop unique self-care practices.

We invite you to come be a part of this important event to learn more about how this model of thriving can improve our wellbeing on campus, and we also invite you to provide meaningful input to all the groups involved about what students need in order to thrive.

And, there will be t-shirts for the first 125 students to participate!

We’re looking forward to seeing you there!

Best,
The Gargoyle Society and Mental Health Committee

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All Gender Restrooms

There is quite a backlog of posts to go through…

Recently, without any announcement or notice from the administration, I woke up to this sign beside the door of one of the restrooms in my dorm:

image1

 

Notably, these signs were not put up across all restrooms/bathrooms on campus. The installment seems arbitrary at best. The two bathrooms on my floor have always been used by “anyone… regardless of gender identity or expression” (and no one on my floor/in my dorm has ever complained about it), but they are not embellished with these shiny new signs.

Well, in any case, now that these are up, I cannot help but wonder what motivated these new signs. Obviously, these are for the LGBTQ students on campus. What do they think? Quote from a friend and current Eph ’18 who identifies as trans:

I have used the same bathrooms on campus for three years, and no one has ever socked me in the face for it. This just seems like much ado about nothing. I mean, really, using a bathroom is not complicated… You go in, you do your business, you get out.

But this is just the experience of one trans Eph. Have other LGBTQ students at Williams experienced discrimination when they shower in their dorms or use a restroom? I haven’t heard of any (nor has my friend), but it is certainly possible that my friend group on campus is limited. As always, informed commentary is wanted!

Regardless, since the administration has already taken the time, effort, and endowment money to install these signs, the least they can do is clarify their (new?) bathroom policy. Assuming that no LGBTQ student has been “socked … in the face” for using the bathrooms on campus as they were, the skeptic in me (and my trans friend) might conclude that this is, at best, yet another example of wasteful virtue signalling, or at worst, yet another example of the administration’s unilateral effort to ram their social agenda down the throats of the Williams community. But maybe that is too much! I should be thankful, right? Besides, without the enlightened (expensive?) guidance of the Dean’s Office/Office of Institutional Diversity and Equity/Gender and Sexuality Resource Center/Davis Center, how on earth would an adult oblivious Williams dimwit undergraduate like me ever know which bathrooms to use?

What do readers think?

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The Simpsons on SJWs

Apologies for the temporary absence – the semester does get busy this time of year! Before we return to our regular programming, check out this chunk of a Simpsons episode. It’s hilarious!

Granted, this Simpsons bit is about Yale, but it echoes eerily familiar sentiments here in the Purple Valley…

Funny (relevant) quote:

But we also need to hire more deans to decide which Halloween costumes are appropriate. Eight deans should do it.

Remember the Taco Six? My sides are aching! Then again, in Dean of the College Marlene Sandstrom’s words, I wouldn’t want to “impinge on the fun of others“…

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College Council Has No Power Over Invited Speakers

An alum tried to get this letter published in the Record:

To the editor,

Skylar Smith’s ’18 February 22 article “CC Approves Uncomfortable Learning as an RSO” (and the comments therein from Lizzy Hibbard ’19) demonstrated a misunderstanding of the College’s new policy with regard to outside funding for invited speakers. Any Registered Student Organization may invite someone to speak at Williams even if the funding for that speaker comes from an alumnus or some other non-Williams organization. The RSO must, of course, abide by the new rules, specifically by revealing the source of the funding to Williams and by providing at least two weeks notice before the event. But, as Director of Media Relations Mary Dettloff confirmed to me, neither CC nor any other student organization can prevent an RSO from inviting a speaker. Only Williams itself may ban a speaker, as it did last year in the case of John Derbyshire.

Annoyingly, the Record refused to publish this letter, choosing instead to issue this correction:

correction

This matters because it is bad enough that Williams empowers Adam Falk to ban speakers with whom he disagrees. If College Council could ban student-invited (faculty-invited?) speakers, madness would follow. One Eph censor is enough!

UPDATE: The headline of the physical Record last week was “CC passes free speech resolution 16-3-1.” There was also this photo caption: “Kevin Mercadante ’17 introduces a resolution intended to enshrine speech and protect individual rights to disagree and protest.” Alas, there is no associated news story that I can find, either on-line or in the paper itself. Can anyone provide details? The College Council website does not allow outsides to see the current year’s agenda or minutes. Sad!

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Commencement 4-June-2017 Information

Greetings to Graduating Seniors –
Commencement is fast approaching. We look forward to helping you celebrate your Williams graduation with your classmates and your families. This is the first of several communications I will send to you about Commencement Weekend. Please read through the end for important information about tickets and caps and gowns.

Below is a summary of major events on June 3 and 4. Please mark your calendar and share with your family and friends.

SATURDAY, JUNE 3

Ivy Exercises. Seniors assemble in the First-Year Quad at 12:50 p.m., the ceremony begins at 1:10 p.m. on the Library Quadrangle.
Refreshments on Chapin Lawn, 3:15 – 4:15 p.m.
A Conversation with Honorary Degree Recipients Gina McCarthy and Gavin A. Schmidt, 3:15 – 4:15 p.m. MainStage, ’62 CTD
Baccalaureate. Seniors assemble in front of the Faculty House at 4:30 p.m., the ceremony begins at 5:00 p.m. in Chapin Hall.

SUNDAY, JUNE 4

Commencement. Seniors assemble in the First-Year Quad at 9:00 a.m., the ceremony begins at 10:00 a.m. on the Library Quadrangle.
President’s Reception: a picnic lunch on Chapin Lawn, immediately following Commencement (~12:15 p.m.)

Seniors process into Ivy Exercises, Baccalaureate, and Commencement in their caps and gowns. The Class Artist, Amalie Dougish, carries the class banner at the front of each procession.
Ivy Exercises is an informal celebration of the Class and its achievements. The Class Officers organize it and preside. Class Gardener Brett Bidstrup plants the ivy, Class Poet Ariel Chu presents a poem, Class Historian Nico MacDougall speaks, Class Musician Scott Daniel performs, Dean Marlene Sandstrom awards over 100 prizes, Class Bell Ringer Nathaniel Vilas rings the bells, and two Class Officers drop a watch from the tower of Thompson Chapel.
Baccalaureate is the interdenominational service held Saturday afternoon. Billy Collins, Poet Laureate of the United States from 2001-20013, delivers the Baccalaureate Address.
Commencement on Sunday morning begins with an academic procession across campus and culminates with awarding your degrees. Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, delivers the Commencement Address.

TICKETS
All of the official events of Commencement Weekend are free of charge and most do not require tickets. In particular, tickets are not required for Ivy Exercises, outdoor Commencement, the Conversation, or the President’s Reception.
Tickets for indoor Commencement: Weather permitting, Commencement is held outdoors on the Library Quadrangle (facing Stetson Hall) and no tickets are required. The ceremony is also simulcast into Brooks-Rogers Recital Hall and live stream for friends and family who cannot attend. In case of heavy rain, the ceremony is held in the Lansing-Chapman Ice Rink. When picking up a cap and gown, each senior receives three guest tickets for the ice rink. Additional seating is available in Chandler Gymnasium where the ceremony is broadcast on a large screen. Tickets are not required for seating in Chandler. We favor an outdoor ceremony even under threatening skies and/or light rain.
Tickets for Baccalaureate: Members of the senior class do not need tickets to attend this event. Due to the limited seating capacity of Chapin Hall, we are unable to seat all of your guests in Chapin. Each senior may request one guest ticket online as described below. We simulcast the Baccalaureate ceremony into Brooks-Rogers Recital Hall and the MainStage at the ’62 CTD. No tickets are necessary for these venues. Baccalaureate is also live streamed.
Request tickets online until May 19. Starting now, seniors may request Baccalaureate tickets at the following webpage: https://webapps.williams.edu/admin-forms/ephpubevent/
Be sure to complete the entire process, including responding to an email within 15 minutes to confirm your request. There is no need to reserve indoor Commencement tickets. All tickets will be distributed when seniors pick up their caps and gowns.

CAPS AND GOWNS
The college supplies caps and gowns free of charge to all graduating seniors. If you attended Fall Convocation and returned your cap and gown, we have them for you. If you did not attend Fall Convocation, we will measure you for a cap and gown. You may pick up caps and gowns and tickets in the Paresky Center Baxter Great Hall at the following times:
Wednesday, May 31, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. at the Senior Resource Fair (only for seniors who were measured in the fall at Convocation)
Thursday, June 1, 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Friday, June 2, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Saturday, June 3, 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Sunday, June 4, 8:45 a.m. Last minute pickup!

I will email you with more information in May.

For more information about Commencement, please see our web site:

commencement.williams.edu/

If you have questions, please contact Carrie Greene (Carrie.Greene@williams.edu) or me.

Cheers,
Jay Thoman, College Marshal
***********************************************************
* John W Thoman Jr.
* College Marshal
* J Hodge Markgraf Professor of Chemistry
* Department of Chemistry, Williams College
* 47 Lab Campus Drive
* Williamstown, MA 01267

* email: jthoman@williams.edu
* Direct phone: (413)597-2280
* Office of the College Marshal phone: (413)597-2347
* http://commencement.williams.edu/
***********************************************************

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Improving International Yield

An e-mail on the effort to improve our yield of accepted international students:

Hi everyone,

Thank you to all those who came to the meeting tonight! It was wonderful meeting you in person. For those who could not make it, below are some of the topics we talked about and information I shared.

Spring Yield Initiatives for Class of 2021 –

1) Connecting via email – All newly admitted international students will be connected to a current international student, ideally based on common interest or geography. I will reach out to you with the information of the students you will be connecting with.

2) Phone/Skype – a – thon – calling all admitted international students who have not yet made a decision on their admission offer. Calls will be made by interested current students and myself. I (Misha) will send out an email listing the dates and times for these calls.

Some helpful links with information about Williams.

How to get to Williams – https://admission.williams.edu/visit/getting-here/
Student Profile 2016-17 – https://admission.williams.edu/files/Student-Profile-2016-2017.pdf
Williams Viewbook – https://admission.williams.edu/viewbook/
Course Catalog – http://catalog.williams.edu/
Community engagement and learning – https://learning-in-action.williams.edu/
Events Calendar – https://events.williams.edu/

A few things to remember when connecting with new admitted students:

Please do not offer any visa advice. All visa related questions should be directed to Dean Pretto. With the changing immigration policies, the experiences of those applying for the F-1 visa this summer may be different from yours, so it is imperative that none of us (including me) offer any advice on visas or visas process.
If you do not have the answer to a question, please send it my way. I would be happy to answer it on behalf of you.
As you reflect on your time at Williams and share your insights, please be honest and positive. There may have been time when the weather or the small size of the town or something else may have been a less than ideal experience, but please think of the bigger picture and focus on the positives. If you receive any especially difficult questions that you do not feel comfortable answering, please feel free to send them to me.
All questions regarding orientation schedule and flights can be directed to Dean Pretto.

Once again, thank you for being willing to yield the class of 2021! We hope that as many students as possible will choose to Williams and join our thriving international community.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Best wishes,
Misha

My anonymous correspondent bolded the section above.

What other efforts does Williams make to improve its yield? I would assume that special efforts are made in areas where Williams yields particularly poorly — especially among African-Americans, but also, I bet, among Hispanics and lower income families — but I don’t know the details. Does anyone?

What advice would you have for Williams about how to improve yield?

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Fun with Stereotypes!

Stereo type analysis

A recent comment by frequent visitor JCD using a racial stereotype in describing a former student leads me to post this analysis of the use of stereotypes in the classroom and their results both socially in the context and particular to the person to whom applied.

Christine Reyna   Lazy, Dumb, or Industrious: When Stereotypes Convey Attribution Information in the Classroom Educational Psychology Review, Vol. 12, No. 1, 2000

A larger version may be seen here. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.573.6067&rep=rep1&type=pdf

There seems to be a lot of this going around.

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Choose Williams Over Harvard

In celebration of previews, reasons why you should choose Williams.

There are several hundreds high school seniors¹ who have been admitted to both Williams and Harvard (and Yale and Princeton and Stanford and . . .). Fewer than 10% of them will choose Williams over these more famous schools. Some of them are making the right choice. They will be better off at Harvard, for various reasons. But at least half of them are making the wrong choice. They (you?) would be better off at Williams. Why?

1) Your professors would know your name. The average Harvard undergraduate is known by name to only a few faculty members. Many students graduate unknown to any faculty. The typical professor at Harvard is primarily concerned with making important contributions to her field. The typical professor at Williams is primarily concerned with educating the undergraduates in her classes. Consider this post by Harvard professor Greg Mankiw, who teaches EC 10, the equivalent of Williams ECON 110/120, to over 750 students each year.

Being an ec 10 section leader is one of the best teaching jobs at Harvard. You can revisit the principles of economics, mentor some of the world’s best undergraduates, and hone your speaking skills. In your section, you might even have the next Andrei Shleifer or Ben Bernanke (two well-known ec 10 alums). And believe it or not, we even pay you for this!

If you are a graduate student at Harvard or another Boston-area university and have a strong background in economics, I hope you will consider becoming a section leader in ec 10 next year. Applications are encouraged from PhD students, law students, and master’s students in business and public policy.

Take a year of Economics at Harvard, and not a single professor will know your name. Instead, you will be taught and graded by (poorly paid) graduate students, many with no more than a BA, often not even in economics! But, don’t worry, you will be doing a good deed by providing these students with a chance to “hone” their “speaking skills.”

2) You will get feedback on your work from faculty at Williams, not from inexperienced graduate students. More than 90% of the written comments (as well as the grades) on undergraduate papers at Harvard are produced by people other than tenured (or tenure track) faculty. The same is true in science labs and math classes. EC 10 is a particularly egregious example, but the vast majority of classes taken by undergraduates are similar in structure. Harvard professors are too busy to read and comment on undergraduate prose.

3) You would have the chance to do many things at Williams. At Harvard it is extremely difficult to do more than one thing in a serious fashion. If you play a sport or write for the paper or sing in an a cappella group at Harvard, it is difficult to do much of anything else. At Williams, it is common — even expected — that students will have a variety of non-academic interests that they pursue passionately. At Harvard, the goal is a well-rounded class, with each student being top notch in something. At Williams, the ideal is a class full of well-rounded people.

4) You would have a single room for three years at Williams. The housing situation at Harvard is horrible, at least if you care about privacy. Most sophomores and the majority of juniors do not have a single room for the entire year. Only at Harvard will you learn the joys of a “walk-through single” — a room which is theoretically a single but which another student must walk through to get to her room.

5) You would have the opportunity to be a Junior Advisor at Williams and to serve on the JA Selection Committee and to serve on the Honor Committee. No undergraduate student serves in these roles at Harvard because Harvard does not allow undergraduates to run their own affairs. Harvard does not trust its students. Williams does.

6) The President of Williams, Adam Falk, cares about your education specifically, not just about the education of Williams undergraduates in general. The President of Harvard, Drew Faust, has bigger fish to fry. Don’t believe me? Just e-mail both of them. Tell them about your situation and concerns. See who responds and see what they say.

Of course, there are costs to turning down Harvard. Your friends and family won’t be nearly as impressed. Your Aunt Tillie will always think that you actually go to “Williams and Mary.” You’ll be far away from a city for four years. But, all in all, a majority of the students who choose Harvard over Williams would have been better off if they had chosen otherwise.

Choose wisely.

¹The first post in this series was 11 years ago, inspired by a newspaper story about 18 year-old Julia Sendor, who was admitted to both Harvard and Williams. Julia ended up choosing Williams (at least partly “because of the snowy mountains and maple syrup”), becoming a member of the class of 2008, winning a Udall Foundation Scholarship in Environmental Studies. Best part of that post is the congratulations from her proud JA.

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This Friday is the deadline for designated a course as P/F or withdrawing from a course

Dear Students,

I hope you are well as we make our way towards the end of term.  I’m writing today to remind you that this Friday, 4/28, is the last day for you to withdraw from a course and also the last day to switch a course to the pass-fail option (if the course allows that option.)

Pass-Fail

You may take up to three courses on a pass/fail basis over your four years, with no more than one course in a given semester. These courses do count towards the thirty-two required for graduation.  (There are some limitations to be aware of. Faculty may designate their course as ineligible for pass-fail, pass-fail courses can’t count towards distribution requirements, and classes towards the major need to be taken for a grade, with the exception of the first course in the major.) More information about the pass-fail option is available here.

Click here to find the online form for designating a course as pass-fail. Be sure to submit the electronic form before the 4:30 pm deadline. Please note that if you are a first year student, you must print out the form and have it signed by a dean prior to the 4:30 deadline.  

Withdrawals

At Williams, course withdrawals are limited to a total of two over your four years of study. Withdrawals are permitted only with permission of your professor as well as a dean, and require you to make up the “course deficiency” quite promptly.  You can learn more about the withdrawal policy here.  If you would like to withdraw from a course, please be sure to speak with your professor first, and then set up a meeting with a dean prior to the deadline of this Friday at 4:30 pm.

Please don’t hesitate to contact the Dean’s Office early this week if you have any questions about the process of withdrawing from a course or designating a course as pass-fail.  You can call the office at 597-4171 to make an appointment, or stop in during walk-in hours (click here for hours), and the deans will be happy to help you.

 

All best wishes,

Dean Sandstrom

 

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The First One Hundred Days …

The significance of this baseline varies in importance with our reversible President.

WPA POSTER Stamps

The WPA was approved on March 6, 1933 as a part of the first one hundred days. The importance of this engine of recovery from the depression is well-known.  So are the many civic landmarks, recreational areas, and artistic productions created for ‘we the people’ that continue in use to this day.

How different from an insistence on a wall and cutting funding for the arts.

I know art and architecture are not hot buttons on this blog, but if anyone’s interested in more detail, below are two good books:

41Y72VKDHHL._SX363_BO1,204,203,200_ 51DaftK55FL._SX387_BO1,204,203,200_

The USPS issued these WPA Poster stamps with ten designs on a sheet of twenty. The date of issue was March 7, 2017 at Hyde Park, New York, the site of FDR’s home, and library and museum.

 

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Fall 2017 Pre-Registration opens Monday! It’s almost time to explore courses!

Greetings, Ephs!

Spring is coming to the Berkshires, and this means that Fall 2017 pre-registration is just around the corner! On Monday, we begin thinking about all the fall semester has to offer. (Sorry, seniors––though post-grad life has its own excitement in store!)

It’s time to make the most of Your 32.

With a recently re-designed course catalog, you can explore all that the Williams curriculum has to offer across divisions and departments.

A Course Catalog Tip: You can use the “Keyword Search” box to pull up courses from across divisions that mention a particular word anywhere in their title or description. Search for whatever you might be interested in, from “food” to “climate” to “storytelling” to anything in between! Or just click around and see what grabs your attention!

As you’re choosing courses for the spring, you may want to consider:

1. Taking a class in every division. This help you complete your divisional requirements, and it will encourage you to have a diverse schedule!

2. Taking a class in a discipline you have never studied before. There are so many departments at Williams, and all of them are incredible! Try something new––perhaps you’ll fall in love with geosciences, or theater, or sociology, or any other discipline.

3. Taking a class that uses different teaching methods. Never taken a tutorial before? What about a course with an experiential component? Always wanted to try a lab course? This spring could be your semester to take a course in a totally different format!

Your 32 courses are an incredible opportunity to explore interests, challenge yourself, and learn about incredible topics. Take a risk. Try something new.

And, email professors to learn more about their courses! There is even a handy guide to help you write these sometimes-daunting emails.

Many of your professors and classmates have been changed by one course they took outside of their comfort zone. They made the most of their 32! You can hear their stories in this short video.

These are Your 32.

They are Your Chance to Explore.

Feel free to contact us with any questions or comments. We would love to hear from you!

Yours in a love of course exploration (and springtime),

Jeffrey Rubel ‘17 and Chetan Patel ’18

Committee on Educational Affairs and College Council

PS – Thanks for all the #Your32 love! Keep it strong!

If you have any interest in joining the campaign, let us know.

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General Housing Lottery Online Registration Now Open

It’s time to register for the General Housing Lottery for the 2017-2018 academic year.
Questions? Be sure to read through all of the linked information here first. If your question isn’t answered there, contact Gail Rondeau Hebert.
Good luck to you all!
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How To Lobby Alumni

How to lobby alumni to help you change college policy:

  1. Get organized first. You only have so many opportunities to get alums to care about the issue that has you all worked up. Actually, you probably only have one opportunity. Create an organization, select officers, put up a web page, recruit a “advisory board” of professors and staff, post of list of all the students who have signed on as supporters, decide on what, specifically, you want the administration to do (including packages of the minimal set of things you’d accept and the maximal set that the administration could conceivably grant). See here for a concrete example.
  2. Be realistic in your goals. You can demand that the College pave the walkways with chocolate, but alumni are unlikely to be impressed with your reasonableness. It is fine to have a big picture goal in mind, but what specific incremental step would you like the administration to take right now. You may want a Chicano Studies department, but what about a visiting professor next year? Some alumni will be in favor of your larger goals — and, by all means, sign them up to help with that — but, to be most effective, you want most alumni to, at minimum, think to themselves, “That doesn’t seem too outrageuous. Why won’t Morty go along?”
  3. Don’t be deluded into thinking that you can have a meaningful effect on alumni fundraising. The College’s fundraising machinery is massive, organized and professional. Virtually nothing that you could possibly say or do would influence it. Even a change that might conceivably have the alumni up in arms — something on the scale of ending Winter Study or the JA system — would not provide enough fodder to change the dollars flowing in. A college that could take the lead in ending fraternities can ride out almost any level of alumni frustration.
  4. Several thousand more words of advice below the break:

    Read more

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Last Lyceum of the year on Wed, 4/26/17

Dear fellow Ephs,

It is both happy and sad for me to do this last Lyceum of the year and also my last Lyceum ever. It’s been a pleasure serving as the Lyceum Coordinator these past 2 years; thank you for all your eager signups and pleasant company.

If you would like to become the next Lyceum Coordinator, please fill out the CC committees application (choose Lyceum Coordinator under “committee selection”)

(10/10 would recommend if you are invested in: building student-faculty/student-staff relations, food, dining, communications, logistics, and event planning! Direct any questions to Minwei at mc11. Deadline is next Friday, 4/28!! )

Ok keep reading for actual Lyceum details…

—-
Have you been waiting to get to know a cool professor or staff over Lyceum Dinner all year? Now is your last chance until October (or if you are a senior, this is your last chance ever)!!

The Nutting Family cordially invites you to ask a professor or staff member (administration, chaplains, health services, Davis Center, campus life, CSS, facilities, dining services, etc.) to a partially subsidized, three-course meal at the Faculty Club for this special dinner. This Lyceum Dinner will be held at the Faculty House at 6:45 pm on Wednesday, April 26th, 2017.

Due to popular demand and to accommodate everyone’s busy schedules, this dinner will be flexible in terms of how many people can be in each party. 1, 2, 3… up to 7 students may invite any ONE member of the faculty or staff to dinner. (We are trying this out still so things may revert in the future.)

Another important clarification: if selected to attend Lyceum, it WILL take away your meal swipe for dinner on 4/26/2017. If you are a senior and not on a meal plan, don’t worry you can still attend! Just clarify on the form that you don’t have a meal plan and the Nutting Fund will also cover your meal!

Spaces are given on a first-come, first-served basis, with preferences given to:
1) those with parties of 4 (3 students and 1 faculty/staff)
2) those who have not yet attended a Lyceum dinner, especially seniors!!!
The entrée options for this dinner are:

-Seared Steaks with Red Wine, Mushrooms, and Onions
-Baked Tilapia with Sun-dried Tomato Parmesan Crust
-Portobello Wellington

As always, forward a confirmation email from your guest; your registration will not be considered until we receive the guest’s confirmation email.
The online registration form will close as soon as all spaces have been filled. If you have any questions, please email WilliamsLyceum@gmail.com


Cordially,

Minwei

Lyceum Coordinator

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African-American Yield Comparison

Williams yields African-American accepted students at a lower rates than (some of) its peers.

frosh-2014W-B

Thanks to a commentator (who should join us as a blogger!) for pointing this out. He also shared (created?) this analysis:

QtPa0Ak - Imgur

1) Thanks for doing this! We need more peer comparisons at EphBlog. This topic would also make for a good Record article and/or senior thesis.

2) Although we compare poorly with Pomona, we do fine relative to many other colleges. So, maybe the glass is half full? I know that the Admissions Office has devoted a lot of time/money/personnel to African-American enrollment.

3) The unknown factor here is standards. The easiest way to get a very high yield among African-American students is to have much lower standards than your peer colleges. If Pomoma lets in a lot of low quality African-American applicants — high school students that Williams/Amherst/Brown/Dartmouth all reject — then Pomona is going to do very well in yielding those students.

4) The most outlier strategy among elite LACs when it comes to African-American applicants is Middlebury’s: admit/enroll fewer. In the class of 2020 (pdf), only 4% of the students are African-American. Thoughts on this?

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Needs a job! Ephblog should act now!

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US citizen. English is first language. Has skills!

UPDATE from DDF: Don’t criticize my friend Swart for not making an Eph-related post! Bill O’Reilly is, of course, famous for seeking sex (sometimes successfully, sometimes unsuccessfully) from women when the power relationships involved were quite imbalanced. The relevant Eph comparison is with Williams professors who seek sex from students, sometimes successfully, sometimes not. At least two Williams professors were so successful in this regard that they eventually married their students. And one is still on the Williams faculty! If you object to O’Reilly, do you also object to this behavior?

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Bias Incident Response Task Force Report

Before it disappears in a fit of historical memory-holing, let’s archive portions of the Bias Incident Response Task Force Report from October 2012:

On November 11, 2011, the words “All Niggers Must Die” were written on a wall on the fourth floor of Prospect Hall. This hate crime caused a large number of our Black community members to feel targeted and unsafe and, overall, placed extraordinary stress on the fabric of the campus. A variety of associated issues and concerns were exposed in subsequent open mic events, campus conversations, and related gatherings. Among the concerns that were raised by many members of the campus community were pointed criticisms of the administration’s initial response to, and early communications about, the crime.

President Falk commissioned the Bias Incident Response Task Force (BIRTF) as the central component of a detailed debriefing of both the initial incident response and related protocols.

This was written almost a year after the event, by which time it was obvious that the entire incident was a “hate hoax.” This graffiti was written by student of color Jess Torres ’12.

Perhaps most important, we affirmed the need to ensure that we’re providing immediate, meaningful, and effective support to the most affected parties, after which we should expand our support to individuals and groups as we track the impact of the incident across campus and over time. This includes the establishment of physical and virtual safe spaces for post-event processing and dialogue, as well as additional components of an institutional infrastructure of counseling and support.

The best “support” that Williams could provide is to tell people that this was a hoax, that minority students have nothing to fear from white racists wondering the hallways of Prospect.

If the Record were a better paper, it would revisit this topic next fall, call up the members of this task force and ask them some hard questions.

The “Culture of Silence”

Perhaps the most frustrating – and enabling – campus condition is what students and others have termed the “culture of silence.” In fact, the name of the student organization that developed in response to the Prospect hate crime is Students Against Silence. While we recognized the highly complex nature of this phenomenon, our conversations focused on a couple of related questions:

What prevents students, faculty, and staff from taking advantage of the reporting websites and formal support structures that exist? If people want to talk about their experiences and concerns, are there unknown barriers to using existing channels more frequently and consistently?
What is it about our campus culture that allows students to believe they can behave like this? Once they leave here for graduate school or the workplace, their behavior changes, by and large, because they know this isn’t acceptable anywhere else. Why does it feel acceptable to them here?

The students on the Task Force explained that this is such a small, interconnected place that if you do something that leads to a falling-out with your team or your close circle of friends, you have few places left to turn. The prevailing social pressure – particularly on women – is not to make waves, not to “make life harder than it needs to be.” There was a strong perception that more people would report acts of discrimination, harassment, and assault if the social backlash to reporting weren’t so strong.

This perception that Williams’ size and distinctive social interconnectedness – typically considered to be positive features – work against us in this way resonates with our perceptions of why staff and faculty also hesitate to report the incidents of discrimination that they deal with.

Or, just maybe, there are fewer instances of actual discrimination at Williams than there are almost anyplace else in the world.

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Senior Week 2017 – Save The Date!

Seniors,

Can you believe how quickly the time has gone? Just one final push– you’ve got this! In anticipation of our graduation weekend, we just wanted to inform you of the dates for Senior Week hosted on campus. For planning purposes, the week will start on Tuesday, May 30th, the first event being at 10 p.m. and runs through Friday, June 2nd, with the final event being Last Chance Dance.

We have plenty of fun events planned for those days before our graduation weekend, including brunches, barbecues, and the lovely dinner at Mount Hope. We will be in contact with you about specifics on all that will take place, but until then, we’ll see you on campus for the festivities starting May 30th.

Thanks and enjoy the rest of the semester!

Best,
Maria, Michelle, Rika, Andrew, Scott
’17 Class Officers

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Endowment Comments

Two points about the ongoing debate over whether Williams should sell the oil and gas assets in its endowment.

First, oil and gas assets do not necessarily help boost the performance of the Williams endowment.

Williams endowment earned -1.5 percent for the year ended June 30, 2016, even though its managers held oil and gas assets. Yale’s endowment, by contrast, where managers are selling out of the oil and gas sector, earned +3.4 percent over the same period.

Second, there seems to be some confusion what it means when critics say Williams’ trustees have financial interests in oil and gas assets.

Critics pressing Williams to sell oil and gas assets do not make a priority of trustees holding oil and gas stocks through retirement or personal mutual funds.

They are more concerned about trustees who, through their jobs, profit from dealing in oil and gas.

A trustee who works in an academic institution whose retirement fund owns Exxon stock is one thing.

A trustee who works for a private equity fund restructuring an oil and gas company to maximize the return upon its sale to a third party is another thing.

A hedge fund trading in and out oil and gas assets to boost quarterly earnings is a third thing.

A review of the current roster of 21 trustees suggests that, through their jobs, as many as 10 have active financial interests in the oil and gas sector.

Thus, any vote by the trustees on whether or not the Williams endowment should sell out of the oil and gas sector begins with a financially interested bias on the part of up to half of them.

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Grounded: An Essay on the Passing of a Roommate

Frank and I had been in touch before I moved overseas last year. Despite the progression of his ALS, he seemed to have come to terms with his imminent passing.

“My breathing (biggest issue), walking, talking, and muscle mass have all declined,” he wrote me in February 2016. “ALS has no treatment or cure so all you can do is manage your symptoms. I just live day to day and try to remain positive.”

But I couldn’t square a diminishing “Franco” with the hardy athlete I had known at Williams. I envisioned Frank – once our red-headed, speedy cornerback – in a wheelchair, on oxygen and his muscles withered away.

Frank was my roommate and best friend in college. He was a small-town boy from nearby Hoosick Falls, NY, the first person in his family to attend college. I was the diplomat’s son, a boarding school product, who had grown up in Asia. Despite the different backgrounds, we clicked. The glue was Williams football in the fall of 1982. We were freshmen defensive backs, low men on the totem pole, who held bags, played dummy defense and sat the bench during games. Having had success in football in high school, we were humbled, and we ended up largely laughing at ourselves and our predicament.

The memories of practices on Cole Field – it’s the practices I remember, not the games — are indelible. Crisp fall days turning cold and dark as September gave way to November. Two-a-days, tackling drills, running sprints – we were building fortitude and friendship, both drenched in sweat. Frank is in the middle of the memories, his helmet wearing high on his head, his arms pumping when he ran, and his cackling laugh. Dick Farley, who would later be inducted into the Football Hall of Fame, was then the defensive backs coach. He was ornery, tough and spare with compliments. If you got a “not bad” from him, you knew you had done well. We practiced hard, overcame injuries and played all four years. A copy of the football program from 1984 has a full-page photo of Frank on the front, leaping high, arms outstretched, in an attempt to block a punt. He is completely airborne.

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Off the field, Frank was organized and responsible, a product, I think, of having become the man of the house at an early age when his father left the family. Frank helped raise his three siblings. His room in our suite was always neat and his homework done. He had a way of retreating home to Hoosick Falls on the weekends, finishing his papers there and coming back refreshed while the rest of us – at least me – felt woefully behind the academic curve. Largely a tee-totaler, Frank was amused by our late-night antics. I recollect his very presence lent some balance to a lifestyle that could be raucous.

Life opened up for Frank after college. He taught and coached in Florida before getting the international bug and teaching in Brussels at an international school. The world became the small-town boy’s oyster. He would take school football and basketball teams around Europe and the Middle East for competitions, and he traveled to northern Italy where his father’s family came from. Those were, in retrospect, the happiest times of his life, next to the birth of his three children.

The older we get, the more we wonder how we will pass on. Frank died on February 16, 2017 at the age of 52, felled by a crippling disease for which there is no cure and no clear cause. Was it abetted by stress brought on by life’s ups and downs? Or toxicity in the soil from a plastics factory in Hoosick Falls? Or, as a medical doctor classmate wonders, blows to the head (and likely concussions) Frank suffered in football?

Thousands of miles away in Central Asia, I can only wonder. I reread Frank’s sentiments in that last email. They included his best friends at Williams.

“If I go tomorrow I have no wants and am content with the life I have had and the relationships I have made,” Frank wrote. “Please give those same regards to Clouder, Dunc, Howie, and Kenard if you talk with them. I think of them often also.”

Franco’s passing makes more tenuous the grasp of the past; there’s a slipping away. The airborne become grounded.

— written by Jeff Lilley ’86 about Frank Morandi ’86. Thanks to Williams College Archives and Special Collections for the image.

Condolences to all.

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Responsible Hosting During Williams Previews

Dear Students,

Williams Previews, our program for admitted students, will be held on April 24 and 25. If you are hosting one or more pre-frosh during this event, please know how grateful we are for your help.

For many of you, the quality of your overnight visit was a determining factor in your own decision to attend Williams, and it is now your turn to shape a similar experience for prospective students. To that end, you should be aware of our expectations for the hosting program, particularly with regard to the College’s alcohol and drug policy.

Williams urges students to act responsibly and in accordance with the law and the Williams Code of Conduct. Providing alcohol of any kind or quantity to underage prospective students is illegal and is not permitted by the College. We stress this policy because there are serious risks involved in not abiding by these rules. Please also be aware that any pre-frosh who chooses to engage in illegal activities puts their admission to the College in jeopardy. We are not asking you to “police” pre-frosh or make their decisions about alcohol for them. We do ask that you please use good judgment and not put pre-frosh in a position of feeling pressure to drink to “fit in”—any form of peer pressure to abuse alcohol conveys a negative image of Williams to the vast majority of prospective students.

We also ask that you keep your eyes out as active bystanders in regard to questions of consent and respect. If you observe a situation that seems to be heading in a dangerous direction, please either intervene or call for help.

Your attention to these concerns during Previews, as well as throughout the academic year, is greatly appreciated. If you have any questions about the policies referred to in this letter, please contact Marlene Sandstrom, Dean of the College. For assistance after hours, please call Campus Safety and Security at 413.597.4444.

Sincerely,

Marlene Sandstrom, Dean of the College
Dick Nesbitt, Director of Admissions

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Elia Kazan’s (’30) Williams

“Elia Kazan, the immigrant child of a Greek rug merchant who became one of the most honored and influential directors in Broadway and Hollywood history […]”

So opens the Times’ 2003 obituary of one of Williams’ most distinguished alumni, whose work profoundly influenced generations of Hollywood stars and auteurs.

Kazan attended Williams in the late 20’s, graduating in the class of 1930; Kazan’s experience there, described vividly in his autobiography, is fascinating as a snapshot of a Williams, and an America, of a bygone age.

I have here excerpted and re-assembled, from his autobiography, Williams in Kazan’s words:

Williams College. I’d never heard of the place […] [but] it was far from home and my father’s authority.

I applied for admission […] Williams would be my liberated life, I’d be on the right track at last.

Then the news came. I’d been accepted at Williams, class of 1930.

Williamstown was pleasant enough that summer in 1980, but in the fall of 1926, when I saw it for the first time, it was enchanting. There was a soft, cool breeze that day, and the sky was a deep saturation of blue near purple over low, ever moving, cotton-white clouds. Looking between the buildings – some classic Georgian, others great lumps of gray or reddish stone – the eye found, at the end of each vista, the softly scalloped Berkshire Hills, called “the mountains.” They embraced a broad valley, making it home. The buildings on campus were well spaced, between them lay generous lawns, perfectly green after an untrampled summer’s growth. Upperclassmen were everywhere, reawakening old acquaintance; trim and healthy, they seemed happy to be back. All the young men were dressed in casually pressed trousers, flannel or corduroy, and soft woolen sweaters – the frost comes early in northwestern Massachusetts. Some boys, especially fit and broad shouldered, wore heavy-knit black sweaters with large purple W’s across their chests. These were the lettermen, the athletes of the teams. Everywhere there was an atmosphere of privilege and affluence; in a bay apart from the storm, the elite was gathering.

It was not all Billsville bliss, however. Kazan was profoundly influenced by his adverse experience with — rather, outside of —  the fraternity scene. He describes the darker side of Williams of the late ‘20s, in the rigidly stratified social life that dominated it and virtually all other private and wealthy institutions of the time:

Now I must confess my foolishness. I had actually expected to be invited to join a fraternity.

That autumn there was no message for me from the fraternity brothers except the message of silence. How crushing that silence was in ’26. It hurt for four dark, cold years.

Jews and blacks weren’t taken into fraternities at Williams in 1926. From that week in 1926 on, I knew what I was. An outsider. In time I began to see I wasn’t the only one. There were three blacks in the class of ’30. At graduation, one was our valedictorian, another our salutatorian; the third was number four in the class.

I decided to relieve father of my dependency. I got a job waiting tables at the Zeta Psi fraternity. I learned how to clear tables six plates at a time. I walked through snow in sneakers to serve the Zetes their breakfast. Sometimes the wind-driven sleet stung like frozen tears.

My salvation was the college library. I lived in the stacks, like a small animal finding refuge in a mass of brambles. I’d take out books by the bagful, read late at night and between classes in the day. Books were the solution to my life […] by the light of their stories, I understood the drama of my own life.

I went to North Adams, five miles by trolley, and entered the movie theater there […] I felt comfortable in the mill town – no rich boys there, just mutts like me.

It took me many years to quiet this rage against my classmates […] But I notice still that every time I receive a request for money from the Williams Alumni Fund, I have a reflex to chuck it in the wastebasket, and usually do.

 

Kazan further reflects on Williams’ lasting effects:

Four years at Williams made a certain kind of man of me, not an agreeable man but a self-reliant, tough-skinned, resolute, and determined man.

In my senior year at Williams, I’d had one teacher who did influence me. Mr. Dutton taught English lit, and I wrote a paper for him on “The Waste Land.” […] In class, it was his passion for what he was teaching that impressed me. In some way I don’t quite understand, Dutton made me believe that perhaps, somewhere in the broad range of a life in the arts, there might be a niche for me and that I might well mark time until that niche appeared.

 

And what a niche it was.

 

Epilogue

From a 2012 Jack Sawyer interview in the Williams Alumni Review:

After [fraternities] were abolished, we found that alumni who had been estranged from the college began to reconnect. This was particularly true of Jewish alumni. Someone who was not Jewish but who certainly illustrated this was Elia Kazan ’30, the great film director, who began to pay attention to Williams. And it made a financial difference too. People who hadn’t given to the college began to give again.

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Defining Our Values

Walking around campus, you’ll see those now-signature posters: “I Am Williams,” they proclaim. But what exactly is Williams? What should Williams be? What do we value as the Williams community?

Next Thursday and Friday in Paresky and Goodrich, we will offer the community a number of ways to share, record, or simply talk about what they value and what they think Williams values. We hope to gather thoughts from you over these two days.

Building on this effort, Ephs from every corner of campus will come together over the next year and beyond in a collaborative effort to answer those questions. We will come together to define what the Williams community is––and the values that underlie it.

With open dialogue and a variety of perspectives, we will discuss what it means to make the best of Williams. Ultimately, we plan to establish a set of concrete values that describes what we all want our Williams to be. These are not simply buzzwords: They are substantive points in a mission statement that outline and describe our common standards and ideals.

These values, the Purple Values for our Purple Valley, will be a concise and accessible list of principles to help guide our community. This effort is about the process just as much as the final product, as this will provide an opportunity for introspection.

So, please help us make this possible. We need your input to better understand our community values. We look forward to seeing you next week!

Tobias Muellers ’18 – Gargoyle Society

Michael Rubel ’19 – College Council

Chetan Patel ’18 – College Council

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Class of 2021 Admissions Data IV

Let’s discus admissions data for the class of 2021. Key table:

admi2

Today is Day 4. For me, the most interesting unknown is: Does Williams discriminate against Asian-American applicants and, if so, by how much? That Harvard/Yale/Princeton/Stanford discriminate is beyond dispute. Indeed, the best historical parallel is with the rampant bias against Jews hundred years ago. (See The Chosen: The Hidden History of Admission and Exclusion at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton by Jerome Karabel for a magisterial history.) But Jews at Williams: Inclusion, Exclusion, and Class at a New England Liberal Arts College argues — fairly conclusively, I think — that Williams did not discriminate against Jews, either at all, much less to the same extent. The basic reason was not primarily that Williams was more well-disposed towards Jews than Harvard/Yale/Princeton. Instead, Jews were less likely to apply to Williams and/or attend Williams if accepted.

Might the same dynamic apply in the case of Asian-Americans? The lower yield for Asian-Americans might provide some indirect evidence for such a claim. At the very least, I would predict that Williams has been doing less discrimination for fewer years than HYP. At the same time, the table we discussed last week is worrying:

ccf_20170201_reeves_2

If about the same raw number of Asian-Americans and whites have Williams-caliber SAT scores, we would expect about the same number of whites/Asians in each Williams class. If the ratio is actually 4:1, and if Williams does not discriminate, than Asian-Americans must be much less likely to apply and/or less likely to enroll if accepted. Thoughts?

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Class of 2021 Admissions Data III

Let’s discus admissions data for the class of 2021. Key table:

admi2

Today is Day 3.

Will the College really yield less than 10% of the 187 black students it accepted during regular admissions? That would be a shockingly low number. Perhaps a close read of Peter Nurnberg’s ’09 thesis on matriculation decisions would tell us if this number is typical. The 43 number for the class of 2020 is not unusual, but there is a fair amount of volatility. The last few years have been 51, 35, 64 and 59.

I believe that there is a significant gender skew on African-American admissions, with women outnumbering men. Does anyone have the exact numbers? In the class of 2010, it was 13 men and 31 women.

Any suggestions for how the College should do better with African-Americans? It seems like more ought to be done with some of the African-American faculty? If I got a private lunch with, say, Neil Roberts, I would be more likely to choose Williams. Also:

One of the great problems that Williams faces in admissions is attracting enough/any African-American applicants will Williams-caliber credentials. Partly, this is because Williams, because of its location and size, is less attractive (on average) to African-American applicants than it is to other applicants. (The same is probably true for international students). But, much more important is the intense competition for elite African-American students from schools like Harvard/Yale/Princeton/Stanford. Almost any African-American applicant with the high school grades and standardized test scores which would place her in the normal range for academic admission (AR 1 and 2) will be accepted at one or more of HYPS. (This is not true of, say, Chinese-American applicants.) Since 90% of applicants (and probably a higher percentage of African-American applicants) admitted to the College and one of these 4 choose HYPS over Williams, this means that Williams has little choice but to accept many African-American applicants who we would not accept were they Chinese-American.

The only practical solution to convince such students to choose Williams is to make it worth their while. And the Tyng (money for graduate school and extra money while at Williams) is the best method available. Therefore, the College should award almost all Tyng Scholarships to African-American applicants, thereby luring 4-8 African-American applicants away from HYPS and to Williams each year. (With luck, HYPS won’t feel compelled to match our offers.) For legal reasons, Williams might need to make an occasional offer to someone who was not African-American, but I doubt that the Department of Justice would be making trouble against these sorts of efforts anytime soon.

As true now as it was in 2009.

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Food Insecurity at Williams I

Today, a Record article was released on the administrative response to food insecurity on campus, where students purposefully choose plans with fewer meals in order to save money. The coverage is excellent! Part 1 of a 3 day discussion.

For purposes of comparing the upcoming plans with this year’s plan: Williams offers four options for meal plans that students living on campus must enroll in: 21 meals a week ($6,760 per year or assuming 24 weeks in a year, $13.41/meal), 14 a week ($6,341 or $18.79/meal), 10 a week ($5,164 or $21.51/meal) or, for seniors, 5 a week ($2,728 or $22.73/meal). Note that a sandwich, a bag of chips, and a drink from, say, Spring Street Market, is approx. $12 – lower than any one meal offered by Williams. Wow!

Key quote from Steve Klass, VP of Campus Life on “the critical goal of ensuring that no student goes hungry”:

It’s important to appreciate the centrality of this principle to our decision-making, because we recognized immediately that this meant constraining some set of choices available to students on dining plans.

Emphasis mine. Note that, according to the Record, Sophia Schmidt ’17 first brought up this issue in the fall of 2015. I don’t know what Steve Klass means by “recognized immediately”, but I suppose his definition of “immediately” is at least a year after the fact. Assume that Steve Klass is being honest and really recognized this problem “immediately.” Then why did it take the administration so long to do anything about it? (Why the competent students, who did the research for the admin to “recognize immediately” this problem, were not included in the decision-making process is the subject of another day’s discussion.)

This is concerning, because I don’t believe that Sophia Schmidt ’17 needed that survey to prove that food insecurity is a problem. Much like how swipes in and out of buildings are monitored by campus security, the meal swipes of students are monitored and recorded as well. How would Dining Services know if you used up all your meals at the end of the week, right? Implication: the College has always had the data it would have needed to “recognize immediately” that food insecurity is a problem on campus. 

So why didn’t the administration simply look at the data they already have? They could have saved Schmidt and other students the two years they spent working on this issue if they simply looked at the data they already have. Why didn’t they, if “ensuring that no student goes hungry” is a “critical goal” of the administration? Something does not smell right (and I’m not talking about Taco Tuesdays in Paresky).

But maybe I am wrong and the College does not keep data on food swipes/whether or not its students eat. Unsolicited suggestion: it should! How else will they know if their students are eating? Isn’t “ensuring that no student goes hungry” a “critical goal” of the administration? That nothing has been done until now implies either (1) that Klass/the administration on “recognizing immediately” food insecurity is as honest as Kellyanne Conway on the Bowling Green Massacre, or (2) that whoever is in charge of “the critical goal of ensuring that no student goes hungry” is incompetent to not have recognized this sooner.

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Spring Etiquette Dinner

Dear Ephs,

​Happy Wednesday! Thanks to the generosity of the Szykowny fund, OSL will be hosting ​the​ ​second Etiquette Dinner​ of the year​ to help you ​prime those dining etiquette skills!

The event will be held at the Faculty House on Tuesday, ​April ​25t​h​ from 6- 8:30 PM and will feature a four-course dinner proctored by an etiquette coach. The aim of the dinner is to provide students with a setting to practice proper etiquette skills and dinner conversations appropriate for a business or formal setting.

Please note that ​priority will be given to those wait listed for the Fall 2016 Etiquette dinner, those who have not previously attended an etiquette dinner, and those who have attended any of the Life After Williams events this month. The list of registrants will be identified the week before, with the wait list also informed. ​Those individuals who are on the wait list and are not given invitation to the Fall Etiquette dinner will get priority registration in the Spring.​

To register to attend, please fill out the following form​.​

Best,

Andrew Lyness, ’17
OSL Event Programming Intern

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