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Help Wanted …

… special investigator! Start immediately!  Must have no connection to Rogaine or Russia.

 

…or Nixon.

10assess1-master768

 

 

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Alumni Funding Dreams

Dylan Dethier’s ’14 amazing article about his attempt to make the PGA included this paragraph:

Before I enrolled in college I spent a year exploring the United States, hoping to learn more about the country through the game. I lived out of my car, played a course in every state and wrote a book about the experience called 18 in America. It did well enough that when I turned pro I had $30k in the bank. Cody, my co-captain at Williams, held a tournament (with dinner and a raffle!) in his hometown to pay for the trip south. We also reached out to former members of the golf team, and a small group of alumni was kind enough to stake us with entry fees for our first six months. As lucky as Cody and I were, we were shorter on resources than most of our peers.

Tell us more! We love hearing stories about alumni supporting recent graduates as they chase their dreams.

And read Dylan’s entire article. It is poignant and beautifully written.

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Williams Insight

Williams Insight is a new student organization. Purpose:

Williams Insight is an online financial publication, in which interested students can submit and publish their liberal arts insights into the economic and financial news.

Good stuff! The more student organizations at Williams, the better. I especially like this:

The objective of the group is first to establish a community of people who are interested in finance and the economy and second to have a place where we can keep up with the market while engaging in productive and concrete analysis.

Williams is a great community, both in Williamstown and in the larger world, but there is so much more we can do to bring together smaller circles of interest. Recall our discussion from a decade (!) ago:

Williams needs EphCOI: Williams-connected Communities of Interest. If on-line communities involving alumni (and students/faculty/staff/parents) are ever going to work, it will only be in the context of shared interests of some sort. My thoughts now are more or less the same as two years ago. The main change is that a blog with new content every weekday is clearly the best way to start. Sign up one staff member to help (read: ensure that at least one new item appears each day) and then find one or two alumni and students to lead the effort. These will be the first authors.

2) Start small. There is no need to create 15 of these from the start. Prove that the concept is a workable one with just one or two sites. I will ensure that an Ephs in Finance blog will succeed. Perhaps Dan Blatt ’85 could be recruited for Ephs in Entertainment. Why not our own Ben Fleming ’04 for Ephs in Journalism? Jen Doleac ’03 for Ephs in Policy? When I took DeWitt Clinton ’98 out to dinner in San Francisco, he was filled with big talk about organizing an Ephs in Technology group of some sort, perhaps with Evan Miller ’05. Recruit them. But first demonstrate the potential (and Williams’s commitment) with a working example.

3) Be open. There must be no logins or passwords (except for authors, obviously). Anyone from anywhere must be able to read these blogs. Anything less will lead to failure. I, for one, certainly wouldn’t bother to participate. There is an argument, perhaps, for keeping some things hidden. For example, no outsider can see my internship posting on the internal OCC site. If it makes the powers-that-be nervous, fine. Hide stuff. Yet, for the most part, this is stupid. Hidden stuff will never be a common point of interest within any EphCOI because most readers won’t, obviously, be able to see it. In addition, I actually hate the fact that I can’t (easily) check to confirm that my listing is correct on the OCC site. There is no real reason for hiding this material. If OCC didn’t want too many outsiders to see it, they could just ask Google to not index that information (DeWitt Clinton can tell you how). But anything that is clearly labeled as “For Williams Students Only” is, obviously, not going to draw a lot of attention from non-Ephs.

4) Be friendly. A blog-savvy person from OIT, like Chris Warren, can help ensure that the blogs have all the standard feeds and options. Older readers will appreciate the ability to easily print things, especially long threads (something that might be nice for EphBlog). Younger participants will insist on RSS and the like. It might even be nice to include options to sign up for a (week) daily or weekly e-mail summary with embedded links. The key is that the EphCOI must make it easy for Ephs to participate in whatever manner they prefer with a minimum of hassle.

Read the rest here. As true today as it was a decade ago.

I especially like the fact that Williams Insight reaches out to alumni.

wi

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Your life at Williams––in an imaginary photograph

Fellow seniors:

Thank you for electing me as your class speaker. I’m deeply honored by this opportunity.

This speech is as much mine as it is yours. It’s called a class speech because it’s for all of us, from all of us. For that reason, I want to invite you to ponder a question, and, if you’re so inclined, share your answer with me:

Let’s imagine I’m putting together a slideshow, and I want an image from every senior. I want each person’s photograph to represent his or her life at Williams—the regular, ordinary, day in day out life you spend most of your time living. What would your photograph be? Describe this scene.

If you need inspiration, some responses I’ve gotten include: walking through the library quad on my way to class with my backpack on and waving to a passerby; sitting in Goodrich talking to friends and drinking coffee; and sending an email while sitting at a high-top table in Sawyer with a reading packet open. (This last one is mine.)

Any reflections are welcome (on this question, or anything else), and if you want to speak more about your image, I’d be happy to meet in person or get in touch via email.

Thank you, once again, for the honor of speaking at Commencement. And thank you for pondering this question. I look forward to hearing from you!

Enjoy the last week of classes and all that Williams has to offer.

Yours in a love of the Purple Valley,
Jeffrey

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Welcoming the Newborn College Republicans

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I expected more of a celebration than this. A group of this sort could thrive from proactive advertising. A few posters in Paresky Center would have sufficed to put the first meeting of this promising group on the radar. Perhaps it’s just a rookie error.

Or perhaps there is intent in the subdued announcement. Considering right-wing views are to Williams College what mongooses are to snakes, the prudent path might be to first feel out for potential backlash. In any case, the organization garnered a modest group with its first meeting–now focus on growing that base.

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Meet David Dudley Field ’25 at Williams Today

image1The weather in Williamstown has been horrible so far in May, cold and rainy. This is the forecast for the next 9 days. Worst May in a generation? I blame global warming!

I will be at the alumni events at Williams today: 3:00 talk with Adam Falk, 4:00 talk with Dukes Love; cocktail party at Faculty Club; dinner at Lasell. I am easily identified by my good looks, winning personality, purple shirt and salmon pants. If you are an EphBlog reader, say Hi!

Any advice on questions to ask? I will probably go with quizzing President Falk about the Derbyshire cancellation and Provost Love about transparency. Perhaps:

President Falk: No event in the last five years has given Williams more of a black eye in the national press than your cancellation last year of a student-invited talk by John Derbyshire, a leading intellectual of the alternative right. Since then, Donald Trump has won the presidency and several leaders of the alternative right — people like Steve Bannon and Jason Miller — have ascended to leadership positions in his administration. I met yesterday with the student leaders of the new Republican Club on campus. They plan on bringing several speakers to campus — including alumni like Mike Needham ’04 and Oren Cass ’05 — Republicans who are often branded as “racists” by their political opponents. In fact, they might even invite me to speak. I agree with some, but not all, of what John Derbyshire has written. Will you also be banning me from speaking on campus?

Provost Love: Your presentation and slide show has been fascinating and informative. However, as a class agent, I receive occasional complaints about transparency at Williams, specifically a disconnect between rich/important insiders and poor/unimportant outsiders. For example, the insiders in this room — all leaders in the alumni fund — get the benefit of learning more about Williams. The outsiders — the 25,000 alumni not invited to this event — don’t. I realize that the College can’t invite everyone to Williamstown for weekends like this. But there is no reason why you could not put the slide show you just shared with us on the Provost web page. Will you? And, if not, why not?

Suggestions welcome!

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New report on Campus Space and Institutional History

To the Williams community,

I’m pleased to announce that the final report from the Committee on Campus Space and Institutional History (CSIH) is available on the president’s office website.

As you may recall, in convening the Committee we wanted to engage the entire community in a consideration of the historical images, monuments and decorations from earlier eras and their implications in a contemporary context. I asked that the Committee offer recommendations on principles that should guide us in such consideration generally, as well as identifying specific images or pieces in particular (starting with the Log mural). With this report the group has ably fulfilled their charge, and their work is now concluded.

The Committee notes that many campuses are confronting similar questions. I think Williams stands out for the thoughtful and inclusive way we approached our effort, especially the intense discussions that the committee’s students led in Goodrich in April 2016. I’m deeply grateful to Committee chair Karen Merrill, Frederick Rudolph ’42 Class of 1965 Professor of American Culture, and all the faculty, staff, students and alumni who served on the group or advised its work. You’ve moved Williams an important step forward.

The report sets out broad principles for considering our institutional history. It also explores three examples in detail. Neither the Committee nor I would suggest focusing solely on the three. But I highlight them here and encourage you to read the report because its thoughtful discussion of the examples illustrates just how complex the issues are, and how requiring of care any decisions about them need to be.

Faculty House: Originally a club reserved almost exclusively for faculty, today the Faculty House has evolved into a space for faculty, students, alumni and staff. But its decor hasn’t evolved meaningfully. This fall we’ll convene an ad hoc working group, drawn from the constituencies that use the Faculty House most, to consider whether and how the decor could be updated to reflect the diverse community that uses it today.

The Herman Rosse painting in the ‘62 Center: The ‘62 Center for Theatre and Dance is home to two important academic departments, whose faculty, staff and students spend time in the building every day. We’ll confer with these people, as the building’s primary occupants, about their preferences regarding decoration broadly, including this painting, about some in our community have expressed concern for its portrayals of women and African Americans, and also for its overall quality. We may also consult others who use the building significantly.

Haystack: The Haystack Monument presents a different sort of opportunity. As the Committee observes in their report, the monument commemorates an event in the summer of 1806 that helped launch the American foreign missions movement. The site is visited and appreciated by people from around the world, most of whom have no connection to Williams. We want to respect their interest while recognizing that other groups experience or view the marker very differently. We will not remove the Monument. But as an academic and inclusive community we need to make its variety of meanings visible for consideration and discussion. We’ll develop a process for that work in the fall.

There’s much more to the report, and I urge you to read it for yourself and consider especially the general principles it elucidates. While the report will be housed on the president’s web page for now, we’ll soon create a permanent location on williams.edu for the Committee’s work and other, related information, to foster continued discussion about the college’s history.

This is an important and complicated endeavor. It has at its heart the very question of the community we aspire to be. We’ll never seek to erase Williams’ history, nor to rewrite it. But we must continue to evolve as a community, and that evolution has to include the voices and perspectives of all those whom we’ve invited here as full members. I’m lifted by the extraordinary efforts of the Committee and the thoughtful participation of our entire campus.

As the Committee notes in the conclusion of their report,

We do believe that Williams can negotiate change without effacing the past; that it has done so at other times in its history and grown as an institution; and that it most successfully negotiates change through processes that encourage the diffusion of information, community-wide reflection and discussion, and a clear understanding of how decisions are made at the college.

I encourage you all to help us advance this project, and I look forward to our next steps together in the fall.

Sincerely,

Adam Falk
President

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Safety Dance Continues III

Let’s discuss the latest Safety Dance court order (pdf). Day 3 of 3.

s3

Other highlights:

1) Good sign for Doe that the Court recognizes the sloppiness/malice of the Williams process. They were out to get Doe from the beginning and, in the end, they got their (former) Eph.

2) New complaint is due May 12. Let’s hope (?) that Rossi, Doe’s attorney, gets her act together and produces a better pleading.

3) Any predictions? I guess (?) that it made sense for the College to fight up until this point on the (realistic?) chance that the case might have been thrown out. But now? Settle the case! Give Doe his degree.

Do other readers think the College should fight? If so, why?

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The Dance of Death …

V0042018 The dance of death: time and death. Coloured aquatint by T. Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org The dance of death: time and death. Coloured aquatint by T. Rowlandson, 1816. 1816 By: Thomas RowlandsonPublished:  -  Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

HR Republicans pass repeal, celebrate on White House lawn. MedicAid as the step to tax cuts.

What will be on the Senate’s dance card?

 

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Outreach by Williams to Prospective Students

TJHSST     I just received an e-mail from the College and Career Center at my son’s high school (he is a freshman this year).  He attends the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, which is public high school in Alexandria, Virginia which draws students from around Northern Virginia through a competitive admissions process each year.  TJ is well known regionally and nationally for the extreme rigor of its curriculum, and in particular for its science, math, and technology offerings.  Demographically, TJ is about 65% Asian-American, 25% non-Latino whites, and 10% everything else.

Among the items in the e-mail was the following tidbit which caught my eye:

Juniors, Want to Know More about Williams College, a highly selective Liberal Arts college in rural Massachusetts with a fantastic math department and Oxford-style tutorials?  Consider visiting Williams in the fall through the Windows on Williams program.  This is an all-expense-paid 3-day visit to Williams, with priority given to low-income students. To apply, go to: https://myadmission.williams.edu/register/WOWApplication2017  Deadline: August 1.

I thought this was very interesting.  Traditionally, despite its academic strength, TJ is not a big feeder to Williams or other highly selective liberal arts colleges, as many of its graduates are focused on engineering.  Among the popular college destinations for TJ grads are MIT, Carnegie Mellon, Georgia Tech, and others.  Nevertheless, Williams is obviously making an effort to reach out to the school in hopes of attracting more of its students (note the pitch for the great math department at Williams, since TJ students are selected based on the mathematical abilities more than anything else).  TJ does not have very many low-income students, however, so I’m not sure how well the WOW program will work there.  I hope this outreach effort is successful however, as I think more TJ students at Williams would benefit both places.

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Does Amherst Lie About Its Admissions Data?

Williams and Swarthmore (and most other liberal arts college) have a meaningful number of students with sub-600 SAT scores. For Williams:

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Amherst (pdf) does not.

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I think that Amherst is “lying” about its admissions data. Recall this discussion and this one. There is simply no way for an elite liberal arts college to have competitive sports teams (especially in male helmet sports) and meaningful racial diversity (especially African-American) without around 5% of the student body having either math or verbal SAT scores (or both) below 600.

The trick:

Amherst consistently reports SAT plus ACT totalling 100% of their enrollees (or the 99% that results from adding rounded numbers).

Both Swarthmore and Williams are consistently reporting a total SAT plus ACT in the 110% to 120% range.

Clearly what is going on here is that Swarthmore and Williams are reporting both the SAT and ACT for students submitting both (as they are supposed to according to the instructions).

Amherst is not. Amherst is pulling a “Middlebury” and only reporting whichever score (SAT or ACT) they used for admissions purposes, presumably whichever is higher. (I know that they receive both scores for the dual test takers). It is incomprehsible that not one single enrolled Amherst freshman took both the SAT and the ACT when 20% of both Williams and Swarthmore’s freshman classes the last two years took both.

This a 2008 comment was from HWC, whose contributions I still miss. Looks like Amherst is still cheating. In the latest Common Data Sets, we see for Williams:

will

For Amherst:

amher

Do you see the trick? About the same percentage of students at Williams and Amherst report ACT scores. That makes sense! Williams and Amherst draw their students from the same populations. But Amherst claims that only 52% (instead of 68% at Williams) report SAT scores. That is the lie. Amherst almost surely gets SAT scores from about the same percentage of its students. It just chooses to ignore those scores from those students whose SAT scores are worse than their ACT scores, pretending that it did not “use” those scores in making its admissions decisions. If that is what they are doing (and it almost certainly is), then Amherst is guilty of fraud. How else to explain their divergence from places like Swarthmore:

swarth

And Pomona:

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And Wellesley:

welle

There is a great story here for the Record, or for The Amherst Student . . .

Perhaps our friends at Dartblog can help us out. For Dartmouth:

dart

I think that Dartmouth is “pulling an Amherst.” Way more than 51% of the first year students enrolled at Dartmouth took the SAT and reported their scores to Dartmouth when they applied. Dartmouth just “forgets” the scores for those with better ACT than SAT scores when it reports its data. How else could the SAT percentage be 51% at Dartmouth but 85% (!) at Harvard, 74% at Yale, and 67% at Brown. (I think that SAT percentages at Harvard/Yale are inflated due to their prestige. Brown’s percentage is in-line with elite liberal arts colleges. Is there an innocent explanation for Dartmouth’s low percentage? I doubt it.)

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(Phew!) Bipartisan Bill Increases Funding for NEA and NEH

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Good news to this ancient Art History major and true believer in the purpose and conduct of art.

https://www.artforum.com/news/id=68199

President Donald Trump is expected to sign a bipartisan agreement reached by Congress on Sunday that will fund the government through September and increase funds allotted to the National Endowments for the Arts and the Humanities by $1.9 million, Jennifer Jacobs and Margaret Talev of Bloomberg report.

The bill, which will be the first major bipartisan measure advanced by Congress during Trump’s presidency, does not reflect Trump’s spending priorities. It boosts funding for the NEA and the NEH, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Park Service—all agencies the president declared would receive less funding—and does not include money for the Mexican border wall, one of the driving forces of his campaign.

… from the ARTFORUM site 2 May, 2017

The CPB (Corporation for Public Broadcast) will receive $445 million, the same as this year.

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2nd Annual Chopped! Event

Dear Williams,

​This Sunday, the Office of Student Life is partnering with Dining Services for ​the 2nd Annual Chopped! event​.​ ​This ​cooking competition is based on the​ popular Food Network show Chopped!​ Like the show, there will be three rounds: appetizer, main course, and dessert.​​ The top three teams will all be awarded prizes!​

The event will take place in Baxter Hall​ on ​​Sunday​ (May ​7​th) from ​330-​6​PM. No cooking experience is necessary to participate.​ You can sign-up as part of a team or by yourself. If you sign up by yourself, you will be placed on a team for the event.

Best,
Andrew Lyness ’17
OSL Event Programming Intern​

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Needham ’04 Leads Coup at Heritage Foundation

From The Atlantic:

The drama over the removal of the president of the Heritage Foundation, Jim DeMint, is partly classic Washington power politics. But it also reflects tensions over the organization’s relationship with the Trump administration and with Trumpist ideology.

DeMint, the former South Carolina senator who has led the conservative institution since 2013, was ousted on Tuesday after a meeting of Heritage’s board, which voted unanimously to remove him. News of DeMint’s likely imminent departure was first reported by Politico last week.

Needham_Mike_TDS_loThe driving force behind DeMint’s ouster, according to multiple sources close to the organization, was Mike Needham, the CEO of Heritage Action for America, the organization’s political arm. Needham, these sources say, made a power play to push DeMint out, and is appealing to both pro- and anti-Trump elements to accomplish it.

“Needham has been laying the groundwork for this for two years,” said a source close to Heritage. “He’s been badmouthing DeMint to board members for a long time. He’s got his sights set on taking over the whole thing eventually.” According to a senior Republican congressional aide, Needham has been “trashing” DeMint to board members and saying that people in the White House and Congress prefer to deal with him rather than DeMint.

Multiple people close to the situation called DeMint’s ouster a “coup,” and said the driving force behind it was not philosophical but old-fashioned ambition and power politics. “This is an old-as-time story,” said one source.

Several people familiar with Needham’s jockeying said he has successfully exploited the growing philosophical tensions on the American right—and, specifically, on the board of Heritage—to get his way.

To the Trump-averse elements on the board, Needham has pointed to DeMint’s growing coziness with the new administration as evidence that the think tank, a beacon of movement conservatism, needs a new steward. At the same time, Needham has been telling pro-Trump board members like Rebekah Mercer that Heritage needs a leader who will follow the president’s lead—even going so far as to float White House chief strategist Steve Bannon, a key Mercer ally, as a potential future president, according to one source.

As always, we wish Ephs success in their chosen fields. Needham, obviously, seeks to increase his stature/power in Washington politics. Do our readers have any advice? My guess is that Needham is positioning himself as a future White House chief of staff. Other options?

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It was worth fighting for then. Have the times changed? If so, how? Is Free Speech still a workable liberty?

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from The Four Freedoms Norman Rockwell, 1943

NYT article  containing student opinions from affected campuses.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/02/opinion/a-controversial-speaker-comes-to-campus-what-do-you-do.html

One hour. Use as many blue books as you need. Sign the Honor Statement.

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Safety Dance Continues II

Let’s discuss the latest Safety Dance court order (pdf). Day 2 of 3.

s2

rossiThat is a fairly harsh smackdown of Doe’s attorney, Stacey Elin Rossi. Are such direct criticisms of lawyerly competence common in court decisions? Are they justified in this case? Does this sort of language provide us with any clues as to where Judge Posner’s sympathies may lie?

lapp As we have commented before, no courtroom battle between the rich (Williams College and its highly experienced lead attorney Daryl Lapp) and the poor (John Doe, the son of poor Ecuadoran immigrants) is ever fair. But Lapp has been involved in several (a score?) of cases like Safety Dance. I believe that this is Rossi’s first. (Although the way that Title IX has evolved at Williams and elsewhere, she may eventually build up a thriving business. Informed legal commentary welcome!

The decision continues:

The evidence of gender-based discrimination offered in the complaint is thin. The unusual feature of this case, however, is that Plaintiff alleges that he was himself a victim of harassment, and even a physical assault, by the party he was alleged to have victimized. His allegations include claims that his own complaints of harassment were treated with less seriousness than the alleged victim’s complaints and that responsible administrators were more solicitous of her because of her gender than of him. At this stage, these allegations are sufficient to boost the complaint over the Rule 12 threshold.

A fair reading of the documents so far would convince most people that Doe’s allegations are most likely true. Smith, while a Williams employee, did slap him. His complaints were, obviously, treated much less seriously. The College was incredible solicitous of Smith. (And we still need to figure out how she got hired by Williams in the first place.) But the College will argue that, even if all of that is true, it was not driven by anti-male bias and that, therefore, Title IX does not apply. How can Doe demonstrate otherwise? What aspects of the case would you urge him to focus on?

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ACE Presents: Williams Week

Hey Ephs!

As the end of the year approaches and the weather gets warmer, ACE wants to celebrate with our annual Williams Week celebration! This year, Williams Week will run the first week of May (May 1st-7th), Take a look at our schedule!

Monday: 8 – 10 PM SPA NIGHT – Upstairs Paresky
Join ACE for a free night of pampering featuring massages, manicures, and hairstyling.

Tuesday: 9 PM HYPNOTIST – Baxter Hall (Pareksy)
Watch a world class hypnotist perform his magic on some of Williams’ own. Free pizza will be provided.

Wednesday: 8 -10 PM STRESSBUSTERS: TASTE of SPRING STREET – Goodrich
Join us for all your Williams favorites. This event will include food from Blue Mango, Spice Root, Spring Street Market, and even Dunkin’ Donuts. Not to mention a Goodrich tab for the entire event and a raffle.

Thursday:
7 PM -12 AM SCREEN ON THE GREEN: MOANA and INSIDE OUT – Paresky Lawn (with a rain location of Towne Field House)
Spend Thursday night under the stars with a double feature of Moana and Inside Out. Cookies and other desserts will be provided.

Friday: 11:30 AM FREE SMOOTHIE DAY – Nature’s Closet
First 100 smoothies are free at the Nature’s Closet smoothie bar.
4:30 – 7 PM NLT PRESENTS : WIT and GRIT
Meet at Paresky front steps
Limited to 200 participants. Come test your wits and your grit on this full campus physical and mental obstacle course.

Saturday: 11:30 – 3:30 PM WILLIAMS DAY CARNIVAL – Paresky Lawn (with a rain location of Paresky)
Booths will be serving free:Smoothies, Soft Pretzels, Snow Cones, Cotton Candy, Popcorn, Fried Dough, Italian Ice, Henna tattoo artist, Airbrush Tattoos, Caricature artist, Palm Reader. But if that’s not enough to entice you maybe a bouncy house and an obstacle course will make the difference. Finally, the dining halls will be closed as Dining Services serve a barbecue on Paresky Lawn for the first two hours.

Sunday:
3 – 6 PM OSL PRESENTS: CHOPPED: WILLIAMS EDITION
Baxter Hall
To round out Williams week OSL will be hosting their annual Chopped cooking competition.

Best,

Lauren Martin and Lucy Putnam, Co-Presidents
Mary Kate Guma and Lexi Gudaitis, General Entertainment
Apshara Ravichandran and Anna Ringuette, Traditions
James Rasmussen and Yvonne Cui, Stressbusters
Elizabeth Sullivan and Madison Feeney, Concerts
Chandler Pearson, Secretary
Hussain Ul Fareed, Treasurer
Izzy Ahn and Ariana Romeo, Marketing

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Congratulations Williams Class of 2017!

Seniors,

The Williams Career Center could not be more proud of your graduation success! Yes, there is life after Williams and it carries the exceptional opportunity ​for​ further personal and professional development​.  In addition to our heartfelt congratulations, we want you to know that we are open and here for you whenever you need us.  As Williams graduates, you retain ​the ​amazing support ​of ​and access to the entire Eph network  for making connections within the alumni community.  Our friendly advisors are happy to speak with you over the summer as well. ​You can edit​ your​ resume or cover letter, practice your interviews on InterviewStream, check out the new jobs in Route 2, or just let us know what you are up to.

Again, congratulations Class of 2017 and best wishes as you spread your wings far beyond Williams.  Remember to come back and see us.  We are always on the lookout for “How’d You Get There?” alumni speakers, Career Trek hosts, and internship and job leads for the next generation of students.

​Here’s to your bright future from your friends at the Williams Career Center:

Dawn Dellea
Barbara Fuller
Don Kjelleren
Kristen McCormack
Robin Meyer
Linda Moran
Mike O’Connor
Dawn Schoorlemmer
Michelle Shaw
Leigh Sylvia

Williams College
Career Center​
1(413)597-231
wcc@williams.edu

 

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Apply for Student-Faculty Committees

College Council solicits self-nominations for student-faculty committees every Spring. These committees consist of faculty, staff, administrators, and students, and play in integral role in determining campus policies and directing change at Williams. All students are encouraged to apply regardless of extra-curricular commitments or prior experience and knowledge of the committee’s policy area. Students may apply to as many as they wish of the following:
College Council Committees:
    • Finance Committee
    • Mental Health Committee
    • Entertainment Co-Sponsorship Committee
    • Great Ideas Committee
Community Life Committees:
    • Committee on Diversity and Community (CDC)
    • Williams Reads (CDC Subcommittee)
    • Grievance Committee
    • Campus Environment Advisory Committee (CEAC)
    • College and Community Advisory Committee
    • Committee on Undergraduate Life (CUL)
    • Claiming Williams Steering Committee
    • Bookstore Committee
Academic Life Committees:
    • Committee on Educational Affairs (CEA)
    • Calendar and Scheduling Committee
    • Lecture Committee
    • Winter Study Committee
Campus Services Committees:
    • Dining Services Committee
    • Career Center Committee
    • Information Technology Committee (ITC)
    • Facilities Director Committee
    • Library Committee
    • Campus Safety and Security Advisory Committee
    • ’62 Center CenterSeries Programming Committee
    • Advisory Committee on College Communications (ACC)
Other Committees:
    • Advisory Committee on Shareholder Responsibility (ACSR)
    • Lyceum Dinner Coordinators
    • Committee on Priorities and Resources (CPR)
Best of luck heading into finals!
Web Farabow & Allegra Simon, ’18
Co-Presidents
Williams College Council
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Safety Dance Continues I

Let’s discuss the latest Safety Dance court order (pdf). Day 1 of 3.

This is the best one paragraph summary of where we are:

s1

Kudos to Judge Michael Ponsor (and/or his clerk).

The central issues of the case are not so much: Is John Doe a bad guy? (Answer: Probably. It is not easy to get punished by Williams twice for sexual assault.) Nor is it: Should we believe Susan Smith? (Answer: Probably not. She is the very picture of a woman scorned.) The two key issues that the court will care about are:

1) What is the nature of the (implicit and explicit) contract between Williams and an enrolled student? The College would like to maintain that this contract is so loose that it can, more or less, kick anyone out, for any reason, and following any procedure that it chooses. As former Williams professor KC Johnson has blogged about extensively, several courts have been sympathetic to this view. Unfortunately (for Williams), courts in its jurisdiction have been less willing (at Amherst and at Brandeis) to grant the colleges free reign.[1] John Doe will argue that the College, implicitly, promises to not expel its students unfairly. Since he was unfairly expelled, the College has broken the contract.

2) Is there (and how can a plaintiff demonstrate) anti-male bias in disciplinary proceedings at Williams? This is a much harder task for John Doe, with much less support in other court cases. (Read The Campus Rape Frenzy: The Attack on Due Process at America’s Universities by KC Johnson and Stuart Taylor for more details.)

a) John Doe can try to provide evidence of anti-male comments/behavior at Williams, but we have not seen much of that in the exhibits so far. What we have seen is lots of anti-Doe comments and, to a lesser extent, anti-accused-students comments. But such complaints are more in the category of generic criticisms of the overall process itself. They aren’t anti-male per se.

b) Doe can try to argue anti-male bias on the basis of disparate impact:

Disparate impact in United States labor law refers to practices in employment, housing, and other areas that adversely affect one group of people of a protected characteristic more than another, even though rules applied by employers or landlords are formally neutral. Although the protected classes vary by statute, most federal civil rights laws protect based on race, color, religion, national origin, and sex as protected traits, and some laws include disability status and other traits as well.

Since all (?) the students punished by Williams for sexual assaults have been male, there is a case to be made. Of course, right-wingers like me think that disparate impact arguments are garbage, that we should no more expect an equal number of women (as men) to be expelled by Williams for sexual assault than we should expect an equal number of women (as men) to finish in the top 100 in the Boston Marathon. But there is no denying that, in other contexts, courts have used disparate impact to make findings of bias.[2]

Regardless of the above, however, Williams should settle this case. If they don’t, discovery will be a nightmare.

[1] I suspect that I am messing up terminology and other issues. Safety Dance is currently being adjudicated in a District Court. Could a lawyer-reader clarify whether Brandeis and Amherst precedents apply?)

[2] Has disparate impact ever worked as an argument in a college sexual assault case? Not that I know of.

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