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Addiction to Your Own Prejudices

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Indeed. Should EphBlog aim for more or fewer “rage clicks” in 2018?

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#1 Comment By Hi On February 6, 2018 @ 8:48 am

Part of the problem is that we as a society give too much weight to the opinions of journalists. The way to think about it is: why would you care about the opinion of someone in a profession making $45k per year (if they had good judgment they would not have become journalists).

#2 Comment By ZSD On February 6, 2018 @ 10:41 am

The way to think about it is: why would you care about the opinion of someone in a profession making $45k per year (if they had good judgment they would not have become journalists).

Good Lord, is this the level of perspective that can be achieved with a Williams education?

#3 Comment By Alum-Anon On February 6, 2018 @ 1:40 pm

“Journalists’ brains show a lower-than-average level of executive functioning, according to a new study, which means they have a below-average ability to regulate their emotions, suppress biases, solve complex problems, switch between tasks, and show creative and flexible thinking.” …

“Each subject completed a blood test, wore a heart-rate monitor for three days, kept a food and drink diary for a week, and completed a brain profile questionnaire.

The results showed that journalists’ brains were operating at a lower level than the average population, particularly because of dehydration and the tendency of journalists to self-medicate with alcohol, caffeine, and high-sugar foods.”

http://www.businessinsider.com/journalists-brains-function-at-a-lower-level-than-average-2017-5?r=UK&IR=T

http://www.taraswart.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Report-Study-into-the-mental-resilience-of-journalists-Dr-Tara-Swart.pdf

#4 Comment By frank uible On February 6, 2018 @ 2:01 pm

In a society which lionizes musicians, movie stars, athletes and politicians why should we get worked up about what or how journalists think?

#5 Comment By Dick Swart On February 6, 2018 @ 2:48 pm

… and here I have based my life on Hildy Johnson and Walter Burns.

#6 Comment By sigh On February 6, 2018 @ 3:06 pm

oh, ffs. I don’t general like this type of work (Neurozone brain profiling) and there’s not nearly enough detail about who the 40 journalists were, how they were selected, and basic statistical significance tests.

Also from that report: Reports had “High scores for abstraction indicat[ing] an ability to think outside of the box and make connections where others might not see them.” Also
“[h]igh scores for value tagging indicate an ability to sift through information and pick out what is pertinent, as well as high levels of meaning and purpose.”

and the “low scores” were explained by lifestyle (too much caffeine, too little water, etc.). So comparing to the average isn’t really the point–an average person living that lifestyle would have a depressed score. even more depressed than journalists? who knows–the report doesn’t say.

I didn’t know we judged the logic of someone’s arguments by how much money they make. Is that why the overpaid idiots on TV have so much influence?

#7 Comment By Alum-Anon On February 6, 2018 @ 3:32 pm

there’s not nearly enough detail about who the 40 journalists were, how they were selected

Often a condition of a voluntary study involves anonymity for the volunteers.

The article seemed fairly clear on how they were selected – first forty out of ninety journalist applicants, from across a variety of media.

A visit to the London Press Club (in conjunction with which the study was conducted) site showed that the first two stories under the rotating headline banner are “Is Your Job Making You Ill?” and “First Drinks Social of 2018 at a Brand-New Venue.” (chuckle).

#8 Comment By Alum-Anon On February 6, 2018 @ 4:01 pm

Also from that report: Reports had “High scores for abstraction indicat[ing] an ability to think outside of the box and make connections where others might not see them.” Also“[h]igh scores for value tagging indicate an ability to sift through information and pick out what is pertinent, as well as high levels of meaning and purpose.”

I never claimed that Dr. Swart’s study didn’t try to present a broader view. The assertion relevant to the post here, though, is the finding of a “below average ability … to suppress biases.”

and the “low scores” were explained by lifestyle (too much caffeine, too little water, etc.). So comparing to the average isn’t really the point–an average person living that lifestyle would have a depressed score. even more depressed than journalists? who knows–the report doesn’t say.

…which suggests a hypothesis that the finding is even more broadly applicable.

I didn’t know we judged the logic of someone’s arguments by how much money they make. Is that why the overpaid idiots on TV have so much influence?

Please refrain from attributing someone else’s argument to me, or implying that I am somehow supporting this argument.

#9 Comment By frank uible On February 9, 2018 @ 1:17 pm

Swart, which of the two Hildy Johnsons?

#10 Comment By Alum-Anon On February 9, 2018 @ 3:21 pm

Swart, which of the two Hildy Johnsons?

More than two… big differences between Lee Tracy, Jack Lemmon and Rosalind Russell!

#11 Comment By Dick Swart On February 9, 2018 @ 4:45 pm

Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau in the 1974 Billy Wilder movie caught the pressroom for me. And every role was a delight … genius in casting including Austin Pendleton in the rolltop desk.

I saw Robert Ryan as Burns and Bert Convy as Hildy in the 1969 revival at the Ethel Barrymore Theater.

Lee Tracy originated the role of Hildy in the 1928 opening of the Hecht- MacArthur play … a long-running success. Rechtal Turgidly Jr, my old roommate, told me his father Sr ’28, took off with a group of friends to see it and enjoyed it immensely. The role of the newspaper man defined Tracy for many years. I have no basis for comparison.

His Girl Friday withCary Grant as Walter Burns and Rosseline Russell as Hildy

#12 Comment By Dick Swart On February 9, 2018 @ 5:00 pm

Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau in the 1974 Billy Wilder movie caught the pressroom for me. And every role was a delight … genius in casting including Austin Pendleton in the rolltop desk.

I saw Robert Ryan as Burns and Bert Convy as Hildy in the 1969 revival at the Ethel Barrymore Theater. Ryan died just a few years later

Lee Tracy originated the role of Hildy in the 1928 opening of the Hecht- MacArthur play … a long-running success. Rechtal Turgidly Jr, my old roommate, told me his father ( Sr ’28) , took off with a group of friends to see it and enjoyed it immensely. The role of the newspaper man defined Tracy for many years. I have no basis for comparison. From what I’ve seen of Tracy in his movie years before his Mexico incident (foreshadowing our current president) and his TV revival, he was kind of the father of Jack lemmon.

‘His Girl Friday’ with Cary Grant as Walter Burns and Rosaline Russell as Hildy is generally conceded to be the avatar of 1930’s screw-ball comedies. But while the fast-paced dialogue and commotion are a continuation of the writers legacy and the Russell performance is fantastic, this version is not ‘The Front Page’ of ” …the son-of-a-bitch stole my watch”.

#13 Comment By frank uible On February 11, 2018 @ 1:46 am

About 15 years ago Williamstown Theatre Festival put on a production.

#14 Comment By Dick Swart On February 11, 2018 @ 10:24 am

Frank …
A mixed review of the WSF 2009 production …

http://www.berkshireeagle.com/stories/williamstown-theatre-festival-the-front-page-hold-the-presses,462752

Interesting though, a rave mention of Neal Patrick Harris in one of the small character roles.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Patrick_Harris

am sorry to read this production as a miss.