Typically excellent article from Benthany McLean ’92 in Vanity Fair:

Our month-long training program [at Goldman Sachs, where McLean worked after graduating from Williams] felt like a continuation of college, with plenty of parties and lots of alcohol. But, of course, it wasn’t college. Unwritten rules had very real career repercussions if you broke them, and they were very different for men and for women. Even small missteps, such as making out with a person in your class, could get a woman marked, but would enhance a man’s reputation. When the real work started, almost immediately a senior man held himself to me as a mentor of sorts. I was failing at work, he told me, and I had made myself “too visible.” He alone saw something redeemable in me. But, of course, his “friendship” came with strings attached (despite the fact that he had an out-of-town girlfriend). I wasn’t sure how to say no.

I felt trapped—my parents, who were at home in Hibbing, Minnesota (population 19,000), were lovely, but very clear that any support was over. Perhaps because I was in search of a savior, I had a too public affair with a colleague my own age, which ended when another analyst pulled me aside and told me the man had a girlfriend. (Life lesson: Save yourself.) When another (married) senior vice president tried to get into my hotel room it was a soul-crushing moment, because I felt that I had set myself up.

All of this made it hard for me to have the kind of chipper, can-do attitude so prized in junior roles. I finally transitioned into a more quantitative role, which utilized my skills, and I distinctly remember a moment when I decided I was either going to quit or finish the job with my head held high. From that point on I did nothing but work, and I stuck it out for three years—I had something to prove. In retrospect, I think what bothered me most was the knowledge that, while we were all going to be judged for things besides the quality of our work, for women, extra-professional judgments accrued almost entirely to our disadvantage, whereas for men, at least the white-male sporty types, it was the opposite. It felt brutally unfair.

Read the whole thing. It is a (surprisingly?) “conservative” take on the #MeToo phenomenon. Worth spending a week on?

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