From the Eagle:

Amos Lawrence Hopkins, railroad tycoon and son of Williams College renowned president Mark Hopkins, aggregated modest holdings at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th in order to create a gentleman’s farm on Northwest Hill Road in Williamstown. Some of the town’s most popular hiking trails cross his former estate, which is now managed by the college’s Center for Environmental Studies as a 2,600-acre experimental forest.

Buxton Farms, as he called it, was an agricultural show place, overseen for many years by Arthur and Ella Rosenburg, for whom the college’s classroom facilities, in the former carriage barn, are named. The main house, near the road, was demolished.

Maybe you should try a Moon-light walk. Adelia Moon and her husband, Andrew Jackson Moon, lived off the land in the midst of what Hopkins later acquired. When her husband died, she remarried another Moon, her nephew Alfred. He refused Hopkins’ offers buy their farm. The holdout was immortalized by the town’s American Revolution Bicentennial project, when Peter McChesney, other Williams students and townspeople dismantled Mr. Moon’s barn and reassembled it near the Rosenburg Center as an agricultural museum. The Moon house no longer exists.

Col. Hopkins died in 1912. His widow gave Buxton Farms to the college in 1934. The college deeded it to the U.S. Forest Service as a research facility. The Forest Service, having established research plots, turned the land back to the college in 1968. Williams has increased the holdings by buying, finally, the Moon lot — which had passed to the Primmer family — and others, as well as receiving gifts of land. It now includes land in New York and Vermont. The college continues the same research plots and other Forest Service studies, which explains the caution given to hikers to stay on the trails — and the colorful ribbons off in the woods.

Should EphBlog spend more time on history and less on (boring!) politics?

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