Sadly, the extraordinary scholarly excellence which initially attracted me to teach at Williams has been replaced by an intolerable level of bullying and indoctrination. As a student at Middlebury College, Dominic Aiello ’22, observed we are in a new era “…when students are encouraged to experience campus life as one long sequence of ideologically-inflicted psychic traumas.”

In this next section of the video, we get to see raw bigotry in action. According to Merriam-Webster, a bigot is “a person who is obstinately or intolerantly devoted to his or her own opinions and prejudices; especially: one who regards or treats the members of a group (such as a racial or ethnic group) with hatred and intolerance.” The transcript is particularly alarming because IB is demanding more space and more resources and more autonomy to live out his abhorrent ideology. Here, he addresses the issue of segregation. First by noticing it inside the room. Later by asking for more of it outside the room.

Start – 53:10

IB: I’m just so confused. Because I did the same comment. I did the same and I don’t care or understand how the logic. I just don’t get it. The critical thing of the room is on the ground. I just don’t get it. Could you dare? How? Are we witnessing this? Am I here today? Because I can’t believe this. The room is literally segregated.  Do you notice that?! Did you notice that? Because I noticed that from being here three seconds.

SO: Me too.

IB: What the hell! I just don’t understand it. Like how could you be so blind? I don’t know. Silence. Everyone goes back to talk to their fathers and their f***ing friends and all these God damn s*** and nothing gets to resolve. We just lose our breath. Right?

SO: Right? This is not a f***ing show.

IB:  I’m not f***ing performing for you. This is not a monologue we created. We didn’t practice the lines before we came here. This is the lines of life. We do this s*** every day. I was talking to my father. I was living my life. I had essays and labs. Leave things behind. But here I am. You didn’t have to do that today. You get to catch up on your homework. Don’t tell me you’all have hard work. Don’t tell me you tired. I’m sick and tired of white people telling me they’ve got f***ing s*** to do. Because this wasn’t in their schedule today and damn, it wasn’t in mine.

SO: Not in my schedule.

IB: But, yet. Here I am wasting time, energy and life. And what do I got to do? You know what I have to do after this? You know what we have to do after this? We gotta find a space and time and community to heal and resist. It looks something like…black previews. And then when we ask for point four of a budget, we get asked to f***ing include you. What the f***?! After we done dealt with this s***.

And we say I just want a little bit of a break. I just want a little bit of an affinity house. I just want a little bit of a not having to speak to Charles Derbyshire time. I just want to have to deal with all these things. And then to come back and get asked: ‘Can it, can it be everyone else?’ What the f***? Everyone else isn’t here right now. It’s just us. We had to leave the meeting just to be here…with you. With ya’all. It’s your job. It is your job right there. And your job right there. And your job right there to be doing the work. We tired!

At this point, it looks like more black students have arrived to support the CARE Now activists. As far as I can tell, SO addressed the room on her own earlier. She then contacted IB and requested that he come and defend her. She or IB may have also sent messages to other black students to join them at the College Council meeting. Ironically, this example of piling on illustrates one of the dangers John Derbyshire discussed in “The Talk: Nonblack Version” where he suggests things about blacks that white parents should warn their children about. Derbyshire cautions it is best to leave an area if a large number of blacks suddenly dominate a public space. IB recognizes the arrival of other black students and explains this show of force is a hallmark of black community.

IB: Another one. You see when you call community they come. That’s what community looks like. Not some minority black guy. What are you talking about? Community looks like…if I call YOU SHOW UP because we’re getting eviscerated, embarrassed in this space. We having to suck d*** and then tell you we don’t like the way it tastes.

That’s what’s happening today. Sure we got the money. But we sick and tired of having to beg, steal, barter, go into every f***ing office, suck some more d*** just to ask for some shit. That’s crazy! Just so that we can get more community. We didn’t ask to interrupt this space. But you have some way of intruding in ours. We didn’t ask for none of that and yet here…we…are. What’s wrong with you?

For me, the comments above represent an earthier, perhaps more accurate, expression of one of the core demands of CARE Now, the demand for affinity housing. As you may remember, the editorial board of the Williams Record was criticized by both The College Fix and Breitbart when it endorsed a CARE Now proposal which would essentially establish segregated housing on campus. This proposal was part of a larger a list of demands “calling upon the College’s trustees to fulfill their ‘obligation to the well-being and safety of its students, faculty and staff’,” according to The Williams Record.

As Maud Mandel noted in her recent letter, many schools are dealing with the conflict between affinity housing and integration. Given the video above, I cannot imagine a worse decision than to give more power and resources to verbally abusive students. It seems particularly dangerous to empower them while also leaving them more isolated, insular, and unaccountable to others.

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