As mentioned earlier on the site, I have decided to try posting on a more regular basis, as opposed to simply commenting.  I am generally a glass-is-half-full kind of person, and typically believe (until proven otherwise) that people in general, and Ephs in particular, are acting/speaking in good faith.

Unlike most current authors and commenters, I have always posted at Ephblog under my own name, so I would like to give you a little background on me so that you have an idea of where I am coming from.  As is apparent from my screen name, I graduated from Williams in 1990.  I lived in Williams A as a freshman and Bryant House for the rest of my time at Williams, and was an 8-season (i.e. 4 year) member of the WRFC (the Williams Rugby Football Club).  I also played broomball and intramural hockey.  I double majored in Chemistry and Political Science.  While I had plenty of excellent professors at Williams, my favorite was Chemistry Prof. David Richardson, who is still teaching.  Many of the chemistry faculty from my time at Williams are still there, which I think speaks well of the department:  Prof. Enrique Peacock-Lopez (he taught the hardest class I took at Williams (Thermodynamics)), John Thoman, Anne Skinner, Charles Lovett, and Lawrence Kaplan.  Some of my political science professors are also still at Williams, including my freshman advisor George Marcus and Michael MacDonald.

After graduation from Williams, I went directly to New York University School of Law.  Because of my background with chemistry, as well as thoughtful advice from the parents of one of my classmates, patent law was an area of interest for me.  Somewhat to my surprise, by the time I graduated from law school in 1993, I headed to a job in the New York office of the then-St. Louis based law firm Bryan Cave in their intellectual property department, focusing primarily on patent issues, but also ended up doing trademark work as well.  I stayed at Bryan Cave for 11 years, then spent two years at the Covington & Burling law firm, and then moved to a smaller IP boutique law firm Jacobson Holman for 7 years.  After 20 years in private practice, I was interested in public service, and took a position as an Administrative Patent Judge at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  It goes without saying, I think, that anything I write on this blog is from me personally, and is not in any way connected with or attributable to the PTAB, the USPTO, or the Department of Commerce (the PTO is part of Department of Commerce).

I have two high school age kids, and spend a lot of time at ice rinks watching my younger son play hockey, and also playing myself.  I also have non-EphBlog related connections with a few anonymous EphBloggers.  I won’t identify who they are, however, as doing so might give away their real identities.

I am looking forward to more regular blogging on EphBlog, starting next week.  If readers have any thoughts or suggestions on what they would like me to write about, please feel free to leave in the comments to this post or others.

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