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EphBlog as a Student

I’m curious about the answer for many of you: Why did you start reading EphBlog? How did you find it, and what has kept you here?

The question is particularly interesting for readers who are students, or who started reading it when they were. I don’t remember many students having heard of EphBlog when I was a student.

I first found EphBlog in my first year, when my first Williams “scandal”/hot issue–The Taco Six, for those who remember it–happened. I was so intrigued with following the development of the issue, and reading everyone’s thoughts on it. Yik Yak was big then, and I loved using it, not to post, but just to read what everyone was thinking, and to see people with different viewpoints talk amongst each other. I didn’t totally know how I felt about the issue myself, but I wanted to hear what people who seemed to feel, very strongly, whatever they felt about the issue, talk about it and express those positions.

Of course, there’s only so much intelligent discussion that can happen on a platform like Yik Yak, but there were a few other places I could go for my fix of opinions. There was Facebook, of course, but as a first year I wasn’t well connected at all to many people who were having those discussions on their own walls. That’s what I liked about Yik Yak more than places like Facebook–it was completely public, based on location, so anyone could read and join without having to be socially connected enough to get to witness the conversation. But either linked somewhere through Facebook, or on Yik Yak, I was able to find a few places that were expressing more long-form opinions of the sort I was interested in.

There was the Williams Alternative, which hosted a good number of pieces about that specific incident and which I don’t believe lasted much longer as a platform. And there was EphBlog, which I think I might have found at yet another remove, linked from a comment or post on the Alternative. My memory is hazy, but in any case, I remember finding myself on EphBlog at some point.

I wasn’t very impressed, to be quite honest. The opinions seemed vitriolic and provocative just for the sake of being provocative, which didn’t really interest me. I also remember opinions being somewhat acerbic towards specific people, calling out students who were writing opinion pieces and whatnot in a way that felt fairly inappropriate for older people to do to current students.

I got the sense, from other platforms, that EphBlog was viewed as kind of reactionary and, to put it mildly, crazy, old alumni who were obsessed with the opinions of 18 year olds. That was the general feeling I got of the student body’s views of EphBlog.

So it was fun, in a way, to look it up every now and then, wondering what sorts of wild opinions were beings spouted over there. It made me angry to read a lot of what was being written, and getting angry in that way is a little bit addictive. Every time there was some new scandal or hot issue on campus, I’d find myself wondering what those wild people over there at EphBlog were saying about it, and I’d read the posts, and they’d make me mad. A lot of the time, there were comments that expressed exactly why things were making me mad, seemingly regular readers who, without fail, would respond to the things I found ridiculous about the posts more clearly than I could. I myself never commented, so that was respectable for me. But then the scandal would pass, and I’d forget about EphBlog again until another few months.

Last year, though, felt like hot issue after hot issue, which is why I found myself on EphBlog more and more. Especially as there felt like fewer platforms to discuss that weren’t my own Facebook feed which really only featured the opinions of people I agreed with on it, I just wanted to read views about what was happening–any views, even if I really disliked them.

An amusing conversation happened near the end of the year, where I was eating dinner with a professor and several other students, and somehow, EphBlog came up. It was something along the lines of the professor saying, there’s some alumni blog that has really conservative and offensive takes on campus events; it was rather funny to be the one at the table who could say exactly what they talked about, what they’d discussed over the years I was there. For one, I was one of the least likely people they would have expected, and two, EphBlog was just so removed from campus life and general student consciousness, that any student being so familiar with it just seemed very, very bizarre to everyone at the table.

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5 Comments To "EphBlog as a Student"

#1 Comment By David Dudley Field ’25 On October 17, 2019 @ 6:49 pm

to see people with different viewpoints talk amongst each other.

It is an indictment of Williams that there is no way for current students to do this easily.

EphBlog was viewed as kind of reactionary and, to put it mildly, crazy, old alumni who were obsessed with the opinions of 18 year olds.

Not that there is anything wrong with that!

#2 Comment By fendertweed On October 18, 2019 @ 9:42 am

“t EphBlog was viewed as kind of reactionary and, to put it mildly, crazy, old alumni who were obsessed with the opinions of 18 year olds. That was the general feeling I got of the student body’s views of Eph Blog”

That has frequently been my assessment(not a compliment) to, though I’m not 18.

#3 Comment By Frank Abagnale, Jr. On October 18, 2019 @ 10:44 pm

I disagree with probably 80-90% of what DDF posts and says here, but I still respect the platform and his support of it through these many years. EphBlog does provide perhaps the only informative and relatively uncensored forum for discussion on the major events and issues of Williams.

#4 Comment By David Dudley Field ’25 On October 19, 2019 @ 8:46 am

> reactionary

I prefer “neo-reactionary.”

> crazy, old

Guilty as charged!

> obsessed

Untrue. Or, at least, each year I become less interested in the opinions of random Williams students writing in the Record. Last year, I didn’t even have the energy to go after that rich, golf-playing, consultant-heading, Asian-American who was, to judge by his prose, the student most likely to be commandant of the re-education camp will be assigned to in a decade or so.

> only informative and relatively uncensored forum for discussion on the major events and issues of Williams

Thanks!

#5 Comment By fendertweed On October 19, 2019 @ 8:05 pm

I appreciate the good and shake my head at the bad. The latter mitigates the value overall imo though I would not check in if I thought it didn’t have some value.

It can have more. Cleansing a certain toxic voice recently is a big plus that should be permanent (just as one point supporting the good trends here and avoiding repeating easily avoidable mistakes).