In a post a few weeks ago, I wrote about on-going discussions about the future of the College Council and the possibility of paying College Council members.  Those discussions have progressed and, as discussed in this article in the Williams Record,  College Council is taking concrete steps to implement changes:

At its Nov. 12 meeting, College Council (CC) passed a resolution to form a committee charged with drafting a proposal for a new student government. The resolution, authored by CC co-presidents Ellie Sherman ’20 and Carlos Cabrera-Lomelí ’20, passed by a vote of 11-9.

The resolution sets out guidelines for a “Student Government Task Force,” which will meet over Winter Study in order to draft the proposal. It will present the finished product to the student body by the end of February.

If there are students willing to take the time to carefully consider how best to structure and run the College Council, this is an excellent idea, and a very good Winter Study-type project.  I don’t know when the College Council was last restructured, but in my opinion its a good idea to revisit the structure periodically.  Aside from simply taking a fresh look at things that people take for granted, the student body turns over every few years, and it makes sense for current students to take ownership of an institution designed to be run by them for their collective benefit.

The committee is apparently likely to be structured so that the vast majority of its members will be representative of other campus groups:

CC will deliberate further on the membership of the Task Force next week, but it will tentatively include three representatives from the Minority Coalition (MinCo); two from CC; one from the Student Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC); one from club athletics; one from a performance-based registered student organization (RSO); one from a faith-based RSO; one from a community service-based RSO; one from the Williams Outing Club (WOC); and two at-large student representatives. Additionally, CC will appoint two College staff members to serve on the Task Force, but without voting or decision-making power.

While having “representative-type” members has some advantages, the proposed structure appears to reserve 9 of 11 slots for such members, leaving almost no room for students who are not there to represent particular types of student groups.  I am guessing that such groups take up a large proportion of College Council’s time, but I not crazy about the idea about having those groups so directly involved in reshaping the institution.  Aside from the obvious problem, for example, of whether one athlete can be said to adequately represent all student athletes for this purpose, why are non-community serviced-based RSO’s (as an example) not given a seat at the table?  If it were up to me, I would have more at-large representatives, and make sure that the committee takes time to meet with the various groups while they formulate their proposal.

On the other hand, if part of the point is to give students ownership of the instutition and its organization and structure (and I think it is), perhaps having alums tell them what to do is counter-productive.

Finally, the article states that members of the committee can either have this be their Winter Study course, or they can receive an $800-$1000 stipend.  I’m less bothered by this than I thought I would be.  While I think having the committee members do this as their Winter Study course is preferable, I can see where some students might not want to give up whatever they are already scheduled to take, and could use some extra money.

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