The best content on EphBlog is often in our comments:

To paraphrase the original tweet:

People might not be happy on this holiday; therefore, we shouldn’t wish that people be happy on this holiday, lest we make them feel alienated.

This is the kind of thinking that gets dissected in “The Coddling of the American Mind”. It’s good to be thoughtful towards others, sure, but constructing an environment where the goal is to make sure everyone is comfortable at all times leads to laughable recommendations results like this.

But, thinking big-picture, it’s just not a service to students to shield them from the very normal and easy-to-handle slights that they will surely encounter in their day-to-day life outside the college. If a student is traumatized by the suggestion that holidays should be happy, they might want to figure out a coping mechanism. I’m curious how someone who is bothered by holiday well-wishing will handle their first performance review at work.

The college already lets many of these fragile students take reduced course loads, bring animals with them wherever they want, use “extra time” on assessments, and consult with the growing bureaucracy of diversity administrators who exist solely to reinforce their worldview.

Moreover, the college increasingly makes these well-meaning recommendations mandatory (for instance, the compulsory microagression trainings or mandates that student leaders ask for pronouns).

Nobody wants to challenge something that, on its own, seems trivial and intended to make others feel more comfortable. But this leads to the orthodoxy developing at Williams that the college’s priority is to make all students feel comfortable, specifically those who complain most loudly.

Exactly right. Hey, Anon! You should write for EphBlog!

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