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What if George Steinbrenner ’52 Had Twitter?

Buster Olney at ESPN creates one of the greatest gedanken experiments in sports history, pondering what THE BOSS would have done, if he had access to Twitter.

Here’s the one of greatest interest to us:

@FayVincent. I accept the suspension. Doesn’t mean I like you. Please go take flying leap off Thompson Memorial Chapel.

Absolutely priceless. Who knew Buster was so familiar with Williamsiana?

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CGCL VI: The “Neighborhood” Housing System — A Pyrrhic Failure of Social Engineering

My discussion text is the Interim Report on the Neighborhood Review Committee.  As a long time critic of the administration’s misguided (and, as this report illustrates, ineffective if not counterproductive) attempts at residential social engineering (even before Neighborhoods, from gender-capping houses to reducing group pick size), I’m glad to be discussing this issue.  I would like to have been proven wrong, but the only really surprising things about this report is just how colossally Neighborhood housing has failed and that the administration has released a document confirming it.  They try to soften the blow as much as they can, trying to muddy the waters by conjecturing that the deep and widespread dissatisfaction with the housing system is in part a proxy for the way that various student groups interact on campus — but the unmistakable conclusion is that the housing system is not a symptom of another illness, but instead of a part of it.
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CGCL V: Accreditation — Introduction and Overview

Come one, come all, to the Fifth Annual CGCL.  For the uninitiated, that’s a “Cross-Generational Community of Learning”.  Though perhaps not quite as brilliant as Frank Costanza’s “Festivus for the rest-of-us,” Dave Kane came up with a pretty good and worthwhile idea — Winter Study (or at least a slice of it) for the rest of us, who can no longer go wander around campus and wonder at the winter whispers of Williamstown’s accumulating snow.  Maybe of greater interest is that CGCL is assuredly one of EphBlog’s most successful — and no less importantly, least controversial — initiatives.

After one year off, due to the rather political nature of CGCL IV (demands of federal judicial employment and all), I’m very pleased to be back and participating for the fourth time this year, to discuss Williams and the Accreditation Process.  My topic is the overview and introduction, more specifically, Williams’s own Self-Study process, the first step in Accreditation.  Self-Study, in turn, comprises an Introduction, Preface, and Overview, which I will talk about in turn, after the cut.

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Brunner Burned By Sutton ’83

Circuit Judge Jeffrey S. Sutton ’83 (lots of legal talent in those 3/8 reunion years) of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit wrote the opinion for the en banc court reinstating the district court’s Temporary Restraining Order that requires Ohio Secretary of State Jennifer Brunner to provide information on mismatches between voter registration and DMV records.

This is especially important in light of the tip of the iceberg of ACORN’s voter fraud voter registration fraud [edited. Note that I said voter not voting, but regardless, I apologize for my imprecise terminology] being revealed, and may determine the election.

With appeal likely to Justice Stevens (as Circuit Justice for the Sixth Circuit) for a “temporary” stay of the en banc opinion, this may not be the end of this story.  Any “temporary stay” would likely be permanent, as it would be moot after the election, and there is probably not enough time for the entire Court to hear this case in enough time to let the TRO go through.

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What do the Hon. Jeffrey Sutton ’83 and Mike Myers have in common?

They both “love gooooooooooooold!”

As Howard Bashman writes:

An opinion in a case captioned 216 Jamaica Avenue v. S & R Playhouse has perhaps a better than average chance at involving erotic entertainment, but alas that proved not to be the case with regard to this decision that the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit issued today. Yet the opinion remains of interest because the decision considers the enforceability of a contractual provision, contained in a lease executed in 1911, stating that “[a]ll of said rents shall be paid in gold coin of the United States of the present standard of weight and fineness.” The trial court had held that the provision was unenforceable. But today, in an opinion by Circuit Judge Jeffrey S. Sutton, the Sixth Circuit reaches the opposite conclusion.

Orin Kerr at the Volokh Conspiracy comments as well:

The question, in simplified form: If a 99-year lease signed in 1912 specifies that the lease payments are $35,000 per year, payable “in gold coin of the United States,” can the lessor almost 100 years later demand that the payment be the value of 35,000 gold coins rather than $35,000?

For 90 years, the lessor only demanded payment of the dollars themselves, essentially ignoring the “gold coin” provision. And from 1933 to the 1970s, the “gold coin” clause was unenforceable under federal law thanks to U.S. monetary policy. But in 2006, a new company bought the property and began demanding the value of 35,000 gold coins instead of just $35,000. Does the language of the contract entitle the company to the value of the gold coins rather than just $35,000? In a very interesting opinion, Judge Sutton concludes that it does. Seems pretty persuasive to me, although I don’t know much about the topic.

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Susan Schwab ’76 Pushes Hard for Free Trade with Colombia

 

United States Trade Representative Susan Schwab ’76 is pushing hard for Congress to ratify the free trade agreement with Colombia and warning economic illiterates about the dangers of gutting NAFTA by “renegotiating it” or imperialistically and unilaterally demanding that other countries adopt our labor, wage, and environmental standards.Read the excerpts from the U.S. News & World Report interview for more detail.

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Antitrust problems in ending early admission?

Over at Truth on the Market, Thom Lambert (co-blogger of my Antitrust and Contracts II professor, Dr. Joshua Wright), notes incorrectly suggests that Williams is involved in discussions on the future of early admission that give off the unavoidable whiff of forbiddencollusive behavior of the sort that elite higher educational entities have been known.

(UPDATE: 10:10 pm)
After looking into the story more closely, it appears that I based my conclusions on some erroneous data, although I remain as firmly opposed to eliminating ED as humanly possible. The meeting discussed in the article linked from TOTM was in June, so I apologize for and withdraw any implication that this was in response to Harvard’s costless PR maneuver. Based on that, I incorrectly concluded that the presidents were meeting “to discuss, among other things, collectively eliminating their early admission programs and reducing merit-based aid.” (as TOTM described the NYT’s description of the June meeting) in response to Harvard.

Obviously, if that WERE the scenario (which it is not), the analysis below the cut would be true (if not necesarily fair or charitable), and I suspect that any such descision-making would not happen in the future.

So, again, my apologies, and I’ll leave my commentary below the cut for posterity rather than eliminate evidence of my errors.

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