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Grade Distribution for 2013–2014

An anonymous professor provided this Williams grade distribution (pdf) for 2013-2014. Comments:

1) Williams should be more transparent, especially with information like this that is available to hundreds of Ephs. (I believe that all members of the faculty are e-mailed a copy.)

2) Summary:

grades

Key question: Has grade inflation at Williams (almost) stopped? Recall this discussion from 8 years ago which quotes a Record article from 2000:

The most frequently given grade in 1999 was an A- and the mean grade hovered just above a B+ at 3.34.

If the average grade since 2000 has only increased from 3.34 to 3.41 then grade inflation, while still a problem, has at least slowed down significantly. The overall average in 2008–2009 was 3.39. Again, the thing I find most embarrassing (and what we need current data about) is the hundreds of A+ grades handed out.

3) The results by Division are consistent with the standard stereotypes.

division

The most distressing aspect of the differences across Divisions (and across departments) is the bad signals that it sends to students. If a student gets a B+ in an intro Computer Science class but an A in Theatre, she might thing that this means she is “better” at theatre than computer science. Isn’t this one way that Williams guides her on choosing a major that matches her abilities? But, of course, the College is lying to her. She is an average student in computer science and in theatre. Lax grading by the latter is misleading her.

There is much more here. Worth a week to discuss?

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Grade Inflation

grad_inflation

Imagine that Professor Kornell wants to do something about this. What advice do you have for him?

Start with transparency. What is the distribution of grades at Williams today? How has it changed over time? How does it vary by department? There is no good reason to keep this a secret, other than shame. Here is the data from 2008–2009. Here is recent data for Middlebury.

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Grade Inflation

Grade inflation is a problem at Williams, one we have discussed many times in the past. Start here for a good introduction. The most annoying aspect of the debate is the refusal by Williams to make the data public, or at least available to students and alumni.

Here are the grade distributions at Middlebury.

midd

The average grade at Middlebury has increased from 3.32 to 3.53 in 11 years. How much higher will it go in the future?

Why can’t Williams be as transparent as Middlebury when it comes to this important topic?

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Grade Inflation Update for Princeton

Grade inflation is a a scourge at many schools, including Williams. See our previous discussions here. In the last decade, the best hope for those interested in fighting grade inflation has come from Princeton. We discussed there efforts here, almost a decade ago. (EphBlog is old!). Alas, it appears that Princeton may be about to give up the fight.

A number of colleges and universities adopted policies designed to curb grade inflation. But one of the most prominent of those institutions — Princeton University — now appears poised to roll back the most controversial part of its policy: a limit of 35 percent on the A-range grades awarded in each course. A faculty report released Thursday made that recommendation, and it was endorsed by the university’s president.

See their recent report (pdf). I hope that the Princeton faculty stands firm.

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Grade Inflation a Decade Ago

From the Record

The Williams faculty voiced its concern over grade inflation at the College as it passed several motions of a proposal by the Committee on Educational Policy (CEP) Subcommittee on Grading, instituting grading targets at the monthly faculty meeting held Feb. 16.

The targets, which range from 3.2 to 3.5 from 100-level to 400-level courses, increasing one tenth of a point per course level, intend to stabilize the mean GPA of the College beginning in Fall 2000 to about 3.3, the mean grade for 1998. The most frequently given grade in 1999 was an A- and the mean grade hovered just above a B+ at 3.34.

“When you take the long view and look from 1960 to 1999, you see overwhelming evidence that grades are moving steadily upward,” Chair of the CEP and James N. Lambert ’39 Professor of Anthropology Michael Brown said.

“The problem is that leaves you no room to move. Grades are so compressed that you start getting into making finer distinctions which are harder and harder to justify at the same time.”
“The so-called ‘Gentleman’s C’ is now the ‘Gentleman’s B+,’” quipped Associate Dean for Student Services and Registrar Charles Toomajian.

Concern over grade inflation is nothing new for the College. Two Williams economics professors issued a report in 1991 indicating that departments that gave out higher grades attracted more students and increased numbers of majors. In 1996 the Steering Committee formed an ad hoc committee chaired by Mark Hopkins Professor of Mathematics and chair of the mathematics department Colin Adams.

And that was ten years ago! Adams, Toomajian and Brown are all still at Williams. The Record ought to do a follow up story next fall. Grade inflation has gotten worse in the last ten years, albeit at a slower pace. My suggestions are unchanged:

Grade inflation is a major problem at Williams. See all the posts in our grading category, especially this one. Although the rate of grade inflation has slowed in the last 10 years, it still exists and the absolute level of grades is too high, leading to all the standard problems.

Fortunately, there is a simple solution. Do what Princeton does.

President Falk ought to appoint a special committee — stuffed with grade inflation opponents like (?) Registrar Charles Toomajian and Professors Michael Brown, George Marcus, Duane Bailey and James McAllister — and charge them with investigating grade inflation at Williams and the experience of peer schools like Princeton. I have little doubt that such a committee would report back with the answer that Falk wants, or at least ought to want: Williams should institute something like the Princeton plan that would force individual departments to start grading both equally and lower.

Want to write great senior thesis or give a memorable MATH/STAT colloquium? Use this approach (pdf) to calculate alternative GPA’s for the Williams class of 2010.

Recall this comment from last summer.

The primary goal of the undergraduate student leadership this year is to repeal the Princeton grading policy because of all of its negative effects on the student body.

As I predicted, that student effort was a failure. The Princeton Plan is working exactly how its proponents wanted it to. See our seminar for details.

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Grade Definitions at Pomona

From last fall:

In response to longstanding concerns about grade inflation at Pomona College, a faculty and student committee is developing a set of grade definitions to guide grading across the college.

The Curriculum Committee began reviewing grading practices last semester, after faculty voted in favor of a process to produce college-wide grade definitions. Pomona currently has no official grade definitions to designate what level of student performance corresponds to each letter grade.

The committee plans to submit a proposed set of definitions to a faculty vote in Spring 2011.

“Our goal is to define, as best we can, how the college wants to grade,” said Academic Affairs Commissioner John Thomason PO ’12, who represents the ASPC on the Curriculum Committee. “We want to reflect the wishes of the people that are doing the grading—the faculty—while taking all viewpoints into account.”

A good idea. Williams should do the same. Even better, Williams should copy the Princeton policy for dealing with grade inflation.

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Grade Inflation is Making Students Lazy

From the Washington Post:

College students study a lot less now than in the 1960s, yet they get better grades.

For students, these trends must seem like marvelous developments. But they raise questions about both declining rigor and potential grade inflation in higher education.

In a forthcoming study in the journal Economic Inquiry, economist Philip Babcock finds the trends linked. As Babcock related in an e-mail, when the instructor “chooses to grade more strictly, students put in a lot more effort.” And when the professor gives easy A’s, students expend less effort.

Williams should copy the Princeton plan for dealing with grade inflation. What worked there will work here.

In the meantime, looking at the links between grades and student effort at Williams would make for a great senior thesis.

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Zero African-American Phi Beta Kappa Members in 2009

I recently observed that, as far as I can tell, none of the students in the 2009 Phi Beta Kappa (pdf) are African American. My methodology is certainly not flawless (based essentially on talking to students in the class of 2009), and it’s possible that a few of these students are African American.

(Previous post about the same results for the class of 2010 here).

I am genuinely interested in why African Americans at Williams appear (at least for two years) to be underrepresented in Phi Beta Kappa. Is it random chance? Academic and extra-curricular choices made by African-American students? Other factors? Does anyone have any thoughts on the relative weights of these factors?

Or is this something that we should never publicly discuss?

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Student Request on Group Performance

This week’s seminar focuses on evaluating the academic performance of groups of Williams students.

A February e-mail from a Williams student:

You probably don’t remember me, but I wrote to you a couple of times last year when I was abroad. I’m now doing a project for my senior seminar in Anthropology and need some information about GPA’s at Williams. In short, I’d like to research the extent to which this ‘wonderfully diverse student body’ performs academically.

Though I’ve heard many second hand stories about black and Hispanic GPA’s being below (1) the Williams average, and (2) even further below the white average (a phenomenon that surfaces in graduate rates, too, apparently), I haven’t been able to find any data on the topic. Do you happen to know if the school releases this kind of information broken down by race?

What should I have told this student?

We ended up having a 30 minute phone conversation. Very fun! What approach do you think I recommended?

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Apology

I recognize that my past posts on academic performance at Williams have offended people, and I apologize. I realize that I have raised the subject in such a way that does not produce a useful exchange of ideas. Rather, my approach has antagonized readers and has resulted in overly personalized exchanges. I realize that I am responsible for this sad state of affairs.

I am striving for a new beginning. To that end, I am trying to write this post in a way that I hope will generate a civil exchange of ideas.

To begin with, I thought it would be useful if I posed a question and asked readers to offer their own thoughts on this difficult topic. With this in mind, I will do my best to avoid dogmatic assertions and hopefully many readers will be able to provide facts to add to the general knowledge of the subject. So here goes:

Do African-Americans and other minority groups have a disadvantage at Williams because of their background?

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Zero African-American Phi Beta Kappa Members in 2010

This week’s seminar focuses on evaluating the academic performance of groups of Williams students.

In a recent thread, Derek (“you then don’t have empirical numbers”), Name-Removed-by-Request (“make up statistics out of thin air”), Rory (“make up numbers”) and others chided me for a lack of data about the racial breakdown of Phi Beta Kappa membership at Williams. Point taken! So, let’s gather some data using the distributed power of the EphBlog readership. There are no African-Americans in Phi Beta Kappa for the class of 2010 at Williams College. See the course catalog (pdf) for the raw data. Start with the Summas:

Bachelor of Arts, Summa Cum Laude
*+Christopher Alan Chudzicki, with highest honors in Physics
*Kristine Grønning Ericson, with highest honors in Art
*Ruth Madeline Ezra, with highest honors in Art
*Cristina M. Florea, with highest honors in History
*Andrew Lawrence Forrest
*Sophie Ariel Glickstein
*Yibai Li
*Zachary Clair Miller, with highest honors in History
*+Ralph Elliott Morrison, with highest honors in Mathematics
*+Kathleen Malone Palmer, with highest honors in Neuroscience

The * indicates membership in Phi Beta Kappa. None of these Ephs are African-American. (Corrections welcome!) See below for the Magnas.

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Athletic Underperformance

This week’s seminar focuses on evaluating the academic performance of groups of Williams students.

Did anyone notice the little trick that I played yesterday? I implied that this was a quote from a Williams faculty committee.

Finally, we recommend that studies of academic performance by under-represented minorities continue to be carried out periodically by the Admissions Committee. We recommend that the interval between such studies be five years. Reports of differences in academic performance tend to contribute to a sense of stigma and to stereotype threat among under-represented minorities, but failure to report on their academic performance is equally undesirable; a 5-year interval is a reasonable compromise.

That is absurd! For decades, Williams has refused to even (publicly) discuss the “academic performance by under-represented minorities.” This is the Administration’s single most closely guarded secret. In fact, the quote is a slightly modified version of one of the conclusions of the 2009 Report by the Athletics Committee (pdf).

Finally, we recommend that studies of academic performance by athletes continue to be carried out periodically by the Athletics Committee. We recommend that the interval between such studies be five years. Reports of differences in academic performance tend to contribute to a sense of stigma and to stereotype threat among varsity athletes, but failure to report on athletes’ academic performance studies is equally undesirable; a 5-year interval is a reasonable compromise.

Williams is the sort of place where studying the academic performance of athletes is perfectly acceptable, even praise-worthy. Studying the academic performance of under-represented minorities is verbotten. Fortunately, EphBlog (or at least Rory and I) have reached agreement on this issue. We both think that Williams ought to study the academic preparation and performance of under-represented minorities.

If Adam Falk were to propose the formation of a faculty committee on that topic, would any EphBlog reader object?

Below the break are excerpts from the MacDonald Report and the 2009 Athletics Report. I can’t imagine Williams ever publishing similar analysis for under-represented minorities. Can you? Political correctness is an ill-defined term, but there is no better example of PC at Williams than the College’s refusal to look as closely and openly at URM admissions/performance as it has at athletic admissions/performance.

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Academic Performance Seminar

This week’s seminar focuses on evaluating the academic performance of groups of Williams students.

Consider this quote from a recent report by a Williams faculty committee.

Finally, we recommend that studies of academic performance by under-represented minorities continue to be carried out periodically by the Admissions Committee. We recommend that the interval between such studies be five years. Reports of differences in academic performance tend to contribute to a sense of stigma and to stereotype threat among under-represented minorities, but failure to report on their academic performance is equally undesirable; a 5-year interval is a reasonable compromise.

1) The Advisory Group on Admission and Financial Aid (AGAFA) is one of the more important but least known faculty committees at Williams. (At one point, it seems to have had student members. Is this no longer true? When did that change? Or maybe it never was true?)

2) “under-represented” is code for African-American and/or Hispanic. Asian-Americans and International students (of all colors) do fine at Williams.

3) Alas, AGAFA does not seem to provide a useful summary of the data. But I bet that what former Williams professor KC Johnson points to for Duke would be similar to what we will find at Williams.

Click for a larger version.

4) When last we were exploring the issue of the academic preparation and performance of different student groups at Williams, Derek recommended that I frame the issue as follows:

Does Williams do enough to serve its minority students, its poor and working class students, its female students, and its international students? It is possible to look selectively at a smattering of evidence — memberships in Phi Beta Kappa and GPA’s come to mind — and conclude that the college could be doing a better job. Williams seems clearly committed to diversity in terms of admissions. Is it doing a good enough job to serve these students after they receive their long-awaited thick envelopes in the spring of their senior year of high school?

I will leave my substantive comments on this point of view for later in the seminar. For now, let me just point out that worry about how Williams serves “its female students” and not mentioning our male students is weird since female Ephs have significantly higher GPAs than male Ephs and are much less likely to be given academic warnings, forced to take time off from the College and so on.

5) What sort of data for Williams would people most like to see?

6) Kudos to the faculty authors of this quote. Although we should always be concerned about any “sense of stigma” and “stereotype threat,” there is no more important policy at Williams than admissions. We reject some applicants and accept others. Are we making the right decisions? (Other schools, like Caltech and the University of Chicago, do things quite differently.) The only way to decide is to have an honest and open discussion about how different groups of students perform at Williams. Without such a discussion, it is impossible to have an informed opinion about admissions policy at Williams.

Would any reader disagree? Would any reader argue that the larger Williams community should not discuss this topic?

UPDATE: As the comment thread documents, the quote at the top is a modified version of one from the Athletics Committee. Annoyingly misleading or an effective rhetorical technique? You make the call!

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Phi Beta Kappa ’11

Here is a listing of the 27 Williams seniors inducted into Phi Beta Kappa. These are the students with GPAs in the top 5% of the class. One of them will almost certainly be the valedictorian. Some (potentially offensive) comments:

  • 9 of the 27 are international students. Although this is the largest percentage that I have ever seen, it is typically the case that international students do better, on average, at Williams than US students. (Previous discussions here and here.)
  • 18 of the 27 were male. (See below the break for details.) I have not looked closely at gender numbers in previous years, but my sense is that men are, if anything, over-represented in PBK despite their, on average, lower GPAs. To anyone with a clue about human biodiversity, this would be the expected result. Men have higher standard deviations in most things, so they should be overrepresented in the tails of the GPA distribution. This would also suggest that Williams does not (nor needs to) offer admissions preferences to male applicants.
  • What is the breakdown by race? (Previous discussion here.) I don’t think that there are any African Americans in the list. (Corrections welcome.) If African American students were just as likely to be in Phi Beta Kappa as other students, we would expect to see 2 to 3. In many years of study, I don’t think that I have ever noticed an African American student in PBK. Have you? (I did see an African Eph in PBK one year.) The PC contingent among our readers should be sure to explain this puzzling anomaly in the comments.
  • Celebrities include: Christopher Fox (EphBlog author), William Lee (EphBlog contributor) and Ville Satopaa (Kane Capital summer associate). Want to be in PBK next year? Hang out with me . . .
  • I am trying to figure out what the names Lee, Meng, Li, Shin and Wang have in common. Suggestions welcome.

UPDATE: Thanks to Andy for providing the correct gender breakdown. Post has been updated accordingly.
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Cornell’s Grading Policy

Continuing our discussion of grading policies, consider how Cornell does things.

WHEREAS, the Committee on Academic Programs and Policies, has determined that it is desirable for Cornell University to provide more information to the reader of a transcript and produce more meaningful letter grades,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Faculty senate adopts the following policies on grade reporting:

1. Transcripts and grade reports for undergraduate students shall indicate, along with the grade earned, the median grade given in the course and the course enrollment. Independent study, honors courses, and individual research may be exempted upon recommendation by the department (or program) and appropriate college committee. Courses with enrollments of fewer than ten students will also be exempt from this policy. This policy shall become effective as soon as technically feasible, but will apply only to classes entering after the effective date.
2. The Office of the University Registrar shall publish at the end of each semester, a list of median grades and enrollments of all undergraduate courses with ten or more students. This policy shall become effective in Spring 1997.

Technical Details

The record of a course on an undergraduate’s transcript now reads, for example:

Hyperspace Travel PHYS 999 3.00 B-
This indicates the course title and number, credits received, and grade. Under the new proposal the record would read:

Hyperspace Travel PHYS 999 3.00 B- (110) (B-)
This indicates, in addition, that the course had an enrollment of 110 and that the median grade was B-.

1) Has Williams ever discussed such a policy? Do you think it is a good idea? I am agnostic about adding this information to the Williams transcript but strongly in favor of making class median grades publicly available.

2) Here are the median grades for every Cornell class (with 10+ students) over the last 13 years. Shouldn’t Williams make similar information publicly available? I think so. Williams should be a leader in transparency among elite institutions. If Cornell or Princeton makes Information X public, then Williams ought to as well (unless a compelling case can be made not to). Transparency should be the default.

3) What other elite schools make grading information public? Links welcome.

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Grading Background

From the Record in 2008, a quiz on grading:

1) About what percent of all grades at Williams last year fell in the “A” range (-A, A or +A)?
2) What was the college-wide average GPA last year?
3) Are average grades across Divisions 1, 2, and 3 roughly equal?
4) In a consortium of about 26 highly competitive colleges and universities with whom Williams consistently shares data (including college GPAs), where does Williams rank in terms of highest average GPA?
5) Does grade inflation continue to exist at Williams?

Let’s see how you did:
1) About fifty percent.
2) As specifically as can be put in print: what amounts to a low B+.
3) No. At the 100, 200 and 300 levels, grades in Division 1 classes are consistently a tenth of a point higher than the average Division 2 and Division 3 grades at those levels. Grades at the 400 level, however, are roughly equivalent across divisions.
4) Williams is consistently near the top of the list, ranking for the 2006 to 2007 academic year among the top six schools in terms of average GPA.
5) Yes. Though grade inflation has slowed as compared to pre-1999 to 2000 rates, inflation still persists.

Useful background information to our discussion. Since this seems to be a topic of wide interest and divergent views, I am going to provide information on Princeton’s experience in a series of daily noon posts next week. Contain your excitement!

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Grade Distribution: 2008-2009

Here is the distribution of undergraduate grades at Williams for the 2008-2009 academic year. There were 15,679 grades awarded with an overall average of 3.39, slightly above a B+.

A+    203
A   3,586
A-  3,951
B+  3,425
B   2,347
B-  1,118
C+    446
C     331
C-    136
D+     36
D      32
D-     20
E      48

More than 49% of the grades given at Williams are some form of A. Recall Peter N. Siniawer’s ’97 thesis: “When A=average : the origins and economic implications of grade inflation at Williams College and other elite institutions.” Things have only gotten worse in the last 13 years. One of Professor David Zimmerman’s students ought to write a senior thesis updating this analysis.

From the course catalog (pdf): Read more

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Grade Inflation

What is the current status of grade inflation at Williams? See here for previous discussion. The Record reported 8 years ago that:

The Williams faculty voiced its concern over grade inflation at the College as it passed several motions of a proposal by the Committee on Educational Policy (CEP) Subcommittee on Grading, instituting grading targets at the monthly faculty meeting held Feb. 16.

The targets, which range from 3.2 to 3.5 from 100-level to 400-level courses, increasing one tenth of a point per course level, intend to stabilize the mean GPA of the College beginning in Fall 2000 to about 3.3, the mean grade for 1998. The most frequently given grade in 1999 was an A- and the mean grade hovered just above a B+ at 3.34.

“When you take the long view and look from 1960 to 1999, you see overwhelming evidence that grades are moving steadily upward,” Chair of the CEP and James N. Lambert ’39 Professor of Anthropology Michael Brown said.

“The problem is that leaves you no room to move. Grades are so compressed that you start getting into making finer distinctions which are harder and harder to justify at the same time.”

“The so-called ‘Gentleman’s C’ is now the ‘Gentleman’s B+,’” quipped Associate Dean for Student Services and Registrar Charles Toomajian.

Indeed. But where are things now? A Record editor mentioned to me that they had sought the latest data but been rebuffed by the Registrar. True? Unless something has changed, the faculty should have access to this data.

[Professor Colin Adams said] “We passed one of the motions which said that we would distribute information to all the faculty at the end of every semester which told them where they were in relation to other departments, whether their GPAs were above or below the other departments.”

Is this still going on? If so, surely there is at least one faculty member who thinks that this information should be made public to force Williams to do something. Are you that faculty member? If so, my mailing address is David Kane, 30 Washington Street, Newton, MA 02458. Mail the paper to me (or e-mail an electronic version) and I will post it here.

Every year, the College exchanges information with a group of about 20 peer institutions of liberal arts colleges. Recently, Williams ranked second in the list of highest annual GPA. This fact concerns many faculty members.

“If the faculty doesn’t control grade inflation, in 10 to 15 years everyone is going to have a 4.0 or higher and the transcript will be utterly useless,” Brown said. “There will be no distinctions possible because everyone will get the same grade. That is one of the important issues that as grades become compressed, it is more difficult to present the nuances in a picture of a student’s performance at Williams.”

Perhaps Professor Brown could give us an update. I also suspect that faculty like, say, Sam Crane would agree with me that something needs to be done about this.

And, it is fun to go back even further, to 1998 when our own James McAllister was a new professor.

Assistant Professor of Political Science James McAllister said he made it clear to all of his students at the beginning of the semester that it would not pan out that way for them; they could not expect inflated grades. He said he distributed articles on the problem of grade inflation and vowed that he would not participate in the phenomenon.

McAllister commented that his stance against grade inflation was inspired by the grade reports from the Registrar. He saw that he was eleventh out of 44 on a list of classes with the highest mean grades, and began to fear that his classes were crowded because students thought they were easy.

McAllister said he deflated grades by downgrading borderline grades. Last year, he tended to upgrade grades on the border because he was a new professor and uncertain of the standards.

McAllister said he now knows that Williams does not pressure professors to grade high. “Williams is not a grade inflationary school,” he said.

Really? Even 10 years later? Show us the data.

For those of us who hire from Williams, this is a real problem. If a student tells me that she got an A from Sam Crane or James McAllister, then I really want to believe that she is one of their very best students. My guess, however, is that all this A tells me is that she is in the top 1/3, which doesn’t tell me much. When James MacGregor Burns put an A on a transcript 25 or 50 years ago, you knew that it meant something.

Do the grades on a Williams transcript mean anything today?

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Fighting Grade Inflation

Although I still haven’t read Peter Siniawer’s ’97 thesis, grade inflation is an occasional topic at EphBlog. Here is an idea that would make for a(nother) great senior thesis. How different would class ranks be if adjustments were made for different grading standards and talent levels across classes at Williams?

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Highest, Highest

Back in the day, completing a senior thesis in economics got you “honors”. The same policy continues, I think. But grade inflation has reared its ugly head even here. In the past, only one of the senior theses won “highest honors,” because, well, only one was the best. There could not, as a matter of definition, be more than one “highest.” I think that this was true in other departments as well. The winner my year was, deservedly, Amy Glass, now a professor at Texas A&M. Yet now the Economics Department hands out highest honors like I-am-so-smart badges on Self-Esteem Day. By my count, there were five awarded in 2005.

How pathetic is that?! I guess it is possible that all five of last years awardees were as smart and hard-working as Amy Glass was 18 years ago, but I doubt it. More likely, we have here just another example of the sort of grade inflation that has infected too much of Williams. Now, to be fair, there has been some progress in fixing things. Latin honors are now awarded to only certain percentages of the class. Registrar Charles Toomajian continues to fight the good fight. Previous discussion here.

Of course, like any type of inflation, giving highest honors out like candy simply deflates the value of the award. When looking at a resume, highest honors from the economics department used to mean something. Now it means much less. And that is a shame. And, as always, the students hurt are among the best. There was one best thesis in the class of 2005, but an outsider will never know which one it was. That student is hurt by a policy which fails to identify the best of the best.

Does anyone know more of the history here? When did the economics department start handing out multiple highest honors? Why did it do so? Although I have had my disputes with, say, Ralph Bradburd, on various topics in the past, I would have counted on him and other seniors members of the department to hold the line. Perhaps the inflation started in other departments and then spread to economics.

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Grade Inflation

Princeton began a serious fight against grade inflation a few years ago. The results so far are encouraging.

In 2004-05, the first year under the new policy, A’s (A+, A, A-) accounted for 40.9 percent of grades in undergraduate courses, down from 46.0 percent in 2003-04 and 47.9 in 2002-03. In humanities departments, A’s accounted for 45.5 percent of the grades in undergraduate courses in 2004-05, down from 56.2 percent in 2003-04. In the social sciences, there were 38.4 percent A grades in 2004-05, down from 42.5 percent in the previous year. The natural sciences, at 36.4 percent A’s, essentially held steady. In engineering, the figures were 43.2 percent A’s in 2004-05, 48.0 percent in the previous year.

Basic strategy seems to be to encourage/force individual departments to meet university wide targets. The departments are then left to their own devices as to both how to distribute the limitted number of A’s among introductory and advanced courses and how to encourage/force faculty members to do the right thing.

What does the distribution of grades look like at Williams today? Comments:

1) A lot of grade inflation has occured since the 1980’s. Back in the day, A+’s were virtually unheard of. [By you! — ed.] It now seems that they are almost common. See this 1998 Record article for background.

2) I am still waiting for Peter Siniawer’s thesis, “When A=average : the origins and economic implications of grade inflation at Williams College and other elite institutions”, to be posted on the College library’s website.

3) Williams has acted on grade inflation recently. The Record reported in 2003 that:

The steady rise in student grade point averages (GPA) observed over decade the past appears to have halted since the implementation of a proposal by the Committee on Educational Policy (CEP) in 2000 that encouraged faculty to cap GPAs at set levels for each course level.

At the time the proposal was made, the CEP Subcommittee on Grading reported a significant increase in average grades since 1990 from a 3.19 to a 3.34. This upward trend reflected a trend of grade inflation from the 2.67 average recorded in 1960. Thus, in February 2000 the CEP voted to set a maximum target GPA and disseminate GPA statistics on how each individual department fared in comparison to the targets.

Where can I find the latest statistics?

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Too Many A’s

Although Oren Cass ’05 makes this point in the context of a discussion of tips, I think that it is important independent of that debate.

Stop giving out As. I have little sympathy for a faculty complaining about rushed-through papers when they award those papers good grades. The GPA of a Williams student has been steadily rising. Either the work we’re doing is still OK, or faculty are giving out good grades for bad work. Stop doing that. The worst that will happen is people unserious about working hard will not take your class (which is what Professor Crane wants, isn’t it?).

If the rise of tutorials and the housing lottery are two of the most important changes for the best at Williams over the last 20 years, then surely grade inflation has been one of worst influences. I think that the situation may have actually gotten better, or at least stabilized, in the last few years. Much of the thanks for this goes, I hear, to the unsung work of College Registrar Charles Toomajian, forcing faculty to confront the problem.

But, from Cass’s comment, a lot more should be done. I can understand why an untenured member of the faculty might hesitate to center her grading curve around a B. I have never heard a good justification for senior faculty refusing to do so.

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