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Deeply Distressed

Williams students, faculty and staff,

In recent weeks, members of our community have been leaving notes and materials in front of the Hollander Hall offices of Assistant Professors Kai Green ’07 and Kim Love to honor and support them at a difficult time. It has now come to my attention that yesterday afternoon a faculty member removed these materials. I am in the process of gathering information about what happened, as I am deeply distressed by any interference with students freely expressing themselves in a way that is not disruptive. In fact, after senior staff and I confirmed that the materials were not impeding movement through Hollander we had asked custodial, CSS and other staff not to disturb them. I regret that we did not communicate this message more broadly.

I want to make clear that I fully support those who were expressing their thoughts and feelings through the content that was removed. People have now replaced that content and added to it. I and senior staff will work with students and others to find a way that it can remain without creating a safety hazard.

I have come to Williams with the goal of fostering a supportive and inclusive community where all members of a diverse learning community will thrive. I ask you to join me in continuing to strengthen these values going forward.

Sincerely,

Maud

Time for another EphBlog investigation? Recall J’accuse!

UPDATE: Kai Green’s office is Hollander 106 and Hollander 111. Do you think that a professor with a nearby office might have gotten sick of looking at a bunch of junk piled in the hallway?

UPDATE 2: Thanks to a commentator for pointing out this Record article about the display (picture added above). If I were a professor who had no choice but to deal with that every day, I would get pretty annoyed . . .

UPDATE 3: From a comment:

McPartland removed the material in his capacity as Chair of the Hollander/Schapiro Users Committee after consultation with Campus Security and a conversation with them about the fire code.

McPartland’s office in Schapiro has now been decorated/vandalized in turn.

More details, please.

Entire Record article below the break:
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Vibrant Campus Community

Latest e-mail from President Mandel:

Williams students, faculty and staff,

Spring is here! Well, spring semester anyway, although you wouldn’t know it by the weather. Ever the optimist, though, I feel like I can see the (day)light at the end of the tunnel. If you’ve been away, welcome back. If you stayed here, I hope you had a great Winter Study.

The new semester will be as busy as ever, starting tomorrow with Claiming Williams. I’m excited for my first experience with this unique program, and the organizers have assembled a great schedule for the day. Please find a way to participate if you can, since the program embodies the values essential to building a healthy and vibrant campus community.

Meanwhile, work on strategic planning is coming along nicely: I’m happy to announce a new website where you can learn all about the effort. I want to start this process by inviting your feedback: if you have comments on our organizational structure and plan for moving forward, please submit them via the website by February 15. That’s when the coordinating committee will begin writing charges for each working group, and we want to be able to incorporate community input. Then, starting later in February, I’ll begin to provide monthly updates via campus email, EphNotes and the project website. These will include information about next steps and further opportunities to share your ideas.

I’m also pleased to announce that we’ve finalized the membership of our new Ad Hoc Committee, which will develop recommendations on how Williams can maximize our commitments to free expression and inclusion. The roster and charge are available on a new page of the Committees website, and also via the Strategic Initiatives menu of the president’s office website. Thank you to the faculty, students and staff who are making time to participate on the committee. This is an important project, and I look forward to working with them.

On another issue of national importance, Williams today submitted a letter to the U.S. Department of Education commenting on their proposed changes to the Title IX process. While we’re always looking for further ways to help prevent and respond to sexual harassment and discrimination, my letter explains how the Department’s proposed changes could actually impede our efforts.

On a happier note, the Teach It Forward campaign recently exceeded both our 85% engagement goal and $650 million fundraising goal. Beyond the numbers I’m proud of TIF’s impact, from funding the new science center to endowing the CLiA directorship to supporting a world-class faculty and expanding financial aid offerings—including our recent elimination of one summer’s earnings contribution for every student on financial aid. We hope the change will help all students explore learning and career opportunities when school isn’t in session. This and many other good things are made possible for us by Williams alumni and friends, so I hope you’ll join me in thanking them. And we’re aiming still higher in areas from financial aid to sustainability, so will make the most of the time remaining before the campaign ends this June.

All of this is just the beginning. I look forward to starting a new semester with you and to seeing you in the dining halls, on the athletic fields, in the classrooms and meeting spaces, and on Spring Street, as well as at Claiming Williams tomorrow.

Lots to unpack here! Alas, no time to do it!

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Thompson Graffiti

Latest racist (?) graffiti:

Williams students, faculty and staff,

This weekend, a student discovered the phrase “Black Riders Liberation Party” written several times on a whiteboard in the kitchen of Thompson Hall. The Black Riders Liberation Party is an organization that uses modern marketing tactics to promote a black supremacist ideology. The group is especially known for trying to provoke reactions on college campuses.

We don’t yet know who wrote the name on the board, or what their intent was in doing so. Because the organization is one that promotes hatred, we will investigate the report as a possible bias incident and Campus Safety and Security is trying to identify the author of the graffiti.

If you have information you think will aid the investigation, please call Campus Safety at 413-597-4444 or submit information through OIDE’s Bias Incident Reporting form. The form includes an option to report anonymously.

Williams should be a place where everyone is welcome. Many of the conversations at next week’s Claiming Williams events will focus on how to fulfill that promise, and we look forward to doing that work with you all.

Sincerely,

Leticia S.E. Haynes, Vice President for Institutional Diversity and Equity
Steve Klass, Vice President for Campus Life
Marlene Sandstrom, Dean of the College

1) What are the odds that this is a hate hoax, meaning that the person who left the note is not actually a supporter of BRLP? I am not sure. On one hand, hate hoaxes are very common at Williams (and elsewhere). On the other, BRLP is a fairly obscure (?) organization. The typical hate hoax is much less subtle.

2) Why is this defined as “graffiti?” The convention, I believe, is that whiteboards are for writing stuff on. If Thompson has a whiteboard, along with a markers publicly available for writing on it, then writing the phrase “Black Riders Liberation Party” is, by definition, not graffiti.

3) Why is this a “possible bias incident?” Again, assume that the Thompson whiteboard is publicly available and that students are allowed, even encouraged, to write on it. If no student would be punished for writing “Democratic Party,” then the College would be on thin ice if it punished a student, with no warning, for writing “Black Riders Liberation Party.” Williams, if it wants to avoid turning into a madrassa, must be viewpoint neutral with regard to political expression.

4) Who gets to decide that BRLP “promotes hatred?” And, yes, I know that the Southern Poverty Law Center has said some mean things about BRLP, but I don’t think that Williams gets to outsource its moral judgments. Scores of Williams faculty — perhaps even a majority — believe that Donald Trump “promotes hatred.” Would writing MAGA on the Thompson whiteboard also merit an investigation by Campus Safety and Security?

5) Why does the “intent” matter? (And note the awkwardness of that sentence in the email.) Williams, unless it has developed the ability to read minds, must enforce its rules in a viewpoint neutral manner. It can punish anyone who writes anything on a whiteboard or it can punish no one. It can’t punish black students (but not non-black) students for writing the same thing. Or vice versa! (What is your guess as to the race of the students who wrote this?)

6) If you are the student who did thing, and they catch you, reach out for help. There are faculty who would support you. Note, especially, that Williams never (?) punished the Mexican-American student who wrote “All Beaners Must Die” nor did it punish Mary Jane Hitler.

7) Note the absurd scare-mongering about “modern marketing tactics.” What does that mean, exactly? They use Facebook?

8) Does the Black Riders Liberation Party really “promote a black supremacist ideology?” I doubt it. Accusations about being a “Supremacist” serve the same purpose today as accusations about being a “Communist” did in the 1950s. The BRLP certainly cares about African-Americans — not that there is anything wrong with that! — and seeks to advance their interests. Calling them supremacists (when they never (?) apply that terminology to themselves) is the worst sort of demagoguery.

When will the College learn that the best way to deal with obnoxious scribbling is to ignore it? No need to hide it — just post a note in the (public?) security logs. The bigger a fuss you make, the more of it you are going to get.

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Board of Trustees Meeting

E-mail from President Mandel:

Last week was the January meeting of the Board of Trustees. The board covered topics that it reviews on an annual basis, like the comprehensive fee and a risk management update, as well as current issues of special interest.

Two items of note:

Provost Dukes Love hosted a session on financial fundamentals, describing our processes for ensuring sound financial management.

Read: Dukes’ 10 year audition to be the next Williams president continues to go well!

Associate Vice President for Finance Matt Sheehy, Chief Information Officer Barron Koralesky and General Counsel Jamie Art ’93 led an annual update on the college’s risk management efforts, including recent work on IT risk and data security.

Back in the day, the Trustees would spend most (all?) of their time talking to faculty. Now they spend lots (most?) of their time talking to non-faculty, including second-tier administrators like Sheehy, Koralesky and Art. Who really runs Williams? Not the faculty. Slice by slice by slice, the death of faculty governance at Williams continues.

Entire e-mail is below the break.
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President Mandel on Free Speech Development

Williams faculty, students and staff,

Numerous conversations have taken place recently, especially among faculty and students, around Williams’ principles and practices governing inviting speakers to campus. I’ve decided to charge an ad hoc committee with exploring various points of view and making recommendations for how Williams can ensure an educational environment that’s both intellectually open and inclusive.

I intend to recruit the committee by the end of the calendar year with counsel from leaders of faculty, staff and student governance. You can expect an update on the membership and charge once the group is constituted in early 2019. My hope is that the committee will engage campus constituencies who are interested in the issue and want to contribute to the development of guidelines appropriate for Williams.

Best wishes,

Maud

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Maud’s Moment!

President Maud Mandel is about to put her stamp on Williams.

Williams faculty, students and staff,

Numerous conversations have taken place recently, especially among faculty and students, around Williams’ principles and practices governing inviting speakers to campus. I’ve decided to charge an ad hoc committee with exploring various points of view and making recommendations for how Williams can ensure an educational environment that’s both intellectually open and inclusive.

I intend to recruit the committee by the end of the calendar year with counsel from leaders of faculty, staff and student governance. You can expect an update on the membership and charge once the group is constituted in early 2019. My hope is that the committee will engage campus constituencies who are interested in the issue and want to contribute to the development of guidelines appropriate for Williams.

Best wishes,

Maud

1) This is exactly the plan that EphBlog recommended two years ago.

Smart presidents use committees! With luck, Falk has already learned that lesson in the debate over the log mural. He should follow the same strategy in dealing with free speech. Create a “Committee on Freedom of Expression at Williams.” Appoint a cross-section of faculty/students/alumni, but with a sotto voce emphasis on free speech. Charge the Committee with reviewing the history of free speech debates at Williams, meeting with members of the College community, and recommending policy going forward.

Best person to put in charge? Philosophy Professor Joe Cruz ’91.

Adam Falk was not smart enough to follow this advice, but Maud Mandel is presidential timber cut from a better forest. (Or she reads EphBlog . . .)

2) Mandel would not be forming this committee if she did not want to move Williams toward the Chicago statement. Yay, Maud!

3) The next step is to pick committee members who will give her the answer she wants. Suggestions? It is not obvious that Mandel should pick many (any?) strong free speechers, like the faculty behind the petition. Does she know that, Michael Lewis, for example, wants free speech? Of course she does! But a committee filled with (too) many Michael Lewii might, counter-intuitively, make her goal more difficult to achieve. What she really wants is a committee which will produce the answer she prefers but is staffed by respected people with no (publicly disclosed) prior positions on the topic of free speech.

4) Such a rule would also provide cover for keeping faculty like Joy James far away. (Is going through the linked nonsense useful?)

5) Mandel should include at least one staff member (Jim Reische would be perfect) and one athletic coach. No one can complain about such choices, especially if the selected individuals have not expressed their views on free speech. But staff — who are at-will employees — are much more likely to know what the boss wants and to give it to her. Athletic faculty, also at-will, are naturally more “conservative” on these issues than their tenured brethren.

6) Should the committee include students? What about alumni? What choice will Mandel make? I am not certain what the best answer is.

7) The committee will have to include some racial minorities. Good choices might be Hispanic economists Peter Montiel or Greg Phelan. I haven’t spoken with either of them about the case, but most economists would be on Mandel’s side in this debate.

8) Mandel would love to have an African-American on the committee. Who should she choose? Not Joy James, obviously. Maybe Neil Roberts? He strikes me (contrary opinions welcome!) as one of the most “right-wing” African-American faculty at Williams, someone who might very well aspire to greater things. Being on this committee, and giving Mandel the answer she wants, would fast-track him toward being Dean of the Faculty.

9) EphBlog favorites Eiko Siniawer ’97 and Lee Park are plausible candidates. Again, I have not discussed this issue with them, but they are sensible, both in their policy judgments and in their willingness to play ball with a new president’s priorities.

10) The most competent high-profile committee in the last decade or so was the Merrill Committee, dealing with the Log mural. Might Karen Merrill be the best person to lead this new committee? What about Joe Cruz ’91 who also served on it?

11) Should Provost Dukes Love seek to be on this committee? Should he seek to chair it? Leading the campus conversation on such a difficult topic is the last item he needs on a resume which is perfectly crafted for his eventual job as an college president, at Williams or elsewhere. On the other hand, this whole thing could turn into an utter disaster, if handled poorly. Tough call!

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Winter Study 2019

Winter Study Registration

The first phase of Winter Study registration in PeopleSoft/Student Records will take place Wednesday, November 7, 9AM EST, through Sunday, November 11.

Some courses required early applications and are already closed; some may be open but require instructor consent. Browse through the Winter Study course offerings and, for courses that interest you, drill down to the Catalog Details to find the course enrollment and consent status. Or you can research courses of interest in the online catalog search or by drilling down to department Winter Study offerings.

Registration for this first phase is not on a first come/first choice basis—for overenrolled courses, instructors will select students after 11/11. Students who are dropped from courses will have a second chance to register 11/26 – 11/30 with open spaces on a first-come, first-served basis at that point.

Questions about Registration?

Check the Registrar’s website or contact the Registrar’s Office at registrar@williams.edu or x4286.

Mary L. Morrison

Associate Registrar

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Register for 2nd Quarter PE Classes

Dear Students-

The registration window for 2nd quarter PE classes will open on Monday, October 15 at 12am.  The first 24 hours are reserved for students who still need to complete their PE credits.  The registration period will run through Friday, October 19 at noon.  Please take a moment to look at the offerings and set a reminder to register next week.  2nd quarter classes begin the week of October 22.
Carolyn Miles
PE Coordinator

To Register:

go to People Soft

under student self service click enrollment

click on PE class registration.

As a reminder the college PE requirement for graduation is 4 credits (2 must be earned in your first year) Students who do not complete the requirement by the end of their sophomore year may not be eligible to study abroad as juniors. For more information about physical education and the PE requirement please visit http://athletics.williams.edu/physical-education/

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Funding Opportunity: Towards Inclusion, Diversity, and Equity (TIDE)

Why can’t we just make these e-mails public? Future historians will thank you Maud Mandel!
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Committee on Priorities and Resources

Why can’t we just make these e-mails public? Future historians will thank you Maud Mandel!
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Clery Report

Latest Clery Report is available (pdf):

To the Williams Community,

The College’s Annual Security and Fire Safety Report was published online in September 2018 and can be viewed at – https://security.williams.edu/files/2018/10/Clery-2018.pdf.

The Annual Security Report discloses information concerning campus safety and security policies and procedures, as well as statistics regarding certain types of crimes reported to the campus and local law enforcement during the calendar year 2017.

This report includes:

· Policies and procedures
· Security awareness programs
· Crime Prevention
· Security of and access to College facilities
· Campus Safety Authorities, CSA
· Possession, use, and sale of alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs
· Sex offenses and the sex offender registry
· Violence Against Women Act VAWA
· Reporting of crimes and emergencies
· Emergency notification systems
· Crime statistics for the years 2015, 2016, and 2017

The Annual Fire Safety Report includes:

· Fire safety policies
· Fire statistics for on-campus student residences 2015, 2016, and 2017
· Fire safety systems, alarm monitoring, and sprinkler systems
· Fire drills
· Policies relating to portable electrical appliances
· Evacuation procedures
· Fire safety training

Together, these reports provide students, prospective students, employees, and prospective employees with key information regarding the security of the campus and surrounding areas, and ultimately, create a safer, more secure campus environment. To request a paper copy of the current Annual Security and Fire Safety Report, please contact our Associate Director for Clery Compliance and Training, Alison Warner at 413-597-4444 or by email at awarner@williams.edu

Regards,

Alison Warner
Associate Director of Clery Compliance And Training

I will have some thoughts tomorrow.

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Faculty Essentials Fair

Wouldn’t Williams be a better college if an excellent teacher like Professor Pieprzak were in the classroom with students rather than writing e-mails?

From: Katarzyna Pieprzak
Date: Tue, Oct 2, 2018 at 11:30 AM
Subject: Faculty Essentials Fair and Fall Coffee Hours
To:

Dear Colleagues,

I write to you today on behalf of the Collaborative for Faculty Development (CFD). We would like to thank you for participating in the Faculty Essentials Fair last month and invite you to join us at the upcoming CFD Faculty Essentials Coffee Hours – a series of drop-in style opportunities to consult with representatives of offices that offer faculty-facing resources. A reminder that the CFD is a group comprised of faculty and staff from different “institutional branches” whose primary work is to interact with, program for, and support faculty at Williams College. Some of our primary goals are to streamline programming and cultivate sustained engagement with faculty members.

The Faculty Essentials Fair in September was a wonderful gathering of people. Around sixty people attended, and the feedback about the quality of interaction and access to information has been overwhelmingly positive. Here are just some examples of questions that faculty asked that started productive conversations:

* I would like to have my students respond with video instead of an essay, can you help?
* Can you help me study the relationship between spaces on campus and students’ emotional moods?
* How can art at WCMA relate to my course?
* How can I use design thinking in my class, when I do not teach with project-based methods?
* How can I get word out about a really interesting research project my students are working on?
* Who do I contact to find a culturally competent therapist?
* What kinds of grant support do you provide? What is the process?

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A More Welcoming and Open Department

For more on pronouns, read this comment from S’18:

’m not going to wade into most of this because I think a lot of the arguing going on here is in bad faith based on some commenters thinking that the idea of someone identifying outside of the gender binary or using pronouns other than he/him or she/her is inherently ridiculous. That’s not an idea I know how to argue against because it’s simply an ad hominem based on a lack of empathy and respect for others.

I do, however, want to respond to the point Prof. Knibbs raised about gendered language, because I think this is a case where the email is poorly worded. The objection to referring to he/him pronouns as male or she/her pronouns as female is that male and female are nouns, and thus saying that someone uses male pronouns would imply that person is male. As an alternative, I (and literally every other trans person I know) describe he/him pronouns as masculine pronouns and she/her pronouns as feminine pronouns. Because masculine and feminine are adjectives rather than nouns, they simply describe the gender of the pronouns rather than label the person as being of a particular gender identity. As for the objection to referring to they/them pronouns as gender-neutral and instead saying they should be referred to nonbinary, I am a nonbinary person who uses they/them pronouns and have never heard that. Actually, I have some pretty strong objections to referring to them as nonbinary pronouns because that would imply that all nonbinary people need to use they/them pronouns (which they don’t), but the administration probably read a thinkpiece somewhere that made that point and decided to go with it…

This actually gets to the final point I’d like to make, which is that so much of this comment thread, and more generally discourse around trans issues, suffers from not talking to actual trans students about what changes we want and how we think about things. I know most of the trans students on campus (I was one myself until June), and none of us would want to harass or report people for making honest mistakes. Using pronouns different from the ones you are socially conditioned to assume, especially they/them pronouns, is really difficult for a lot of people, and we get that. I really can’t imagine any student going to the administration about being misgendered by a faculty or staff member unless it was something that happened chronically and with clear malice. What we want is to be able to just do our work and be respected by others in our community; to be referred to by the names and pronouns we feel comfortable with and not have it be the defining issue of our lives. When my department (in Division III, lest you think that all trans people are confined to the humanities) made the decision last year to have people introduce themselves with pronouns at the beginnings of classes, it was awkward at first and people were nervous about slipping up. Mistakes happened, apologies were awkwardly muttered, and then everyone moved on. By the end of the semester, it was second nature to everyone that the weekly department lunch started with everyone introducing themselves with their name, class year, and pronouns. The building did not burn down, and our academic work did not degrade. We simply became a more welcoming and open department, and it is my sincere hope that more of Williams can follow in that pursuit.

Good stuff. S’18 should join us as an author! Their perspective belongs on the front page of EphBlog, not buried at the bottom of an (interesting!) comment thread.

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Responsible employees and reporting responsibilities

From the Dean of the College to the Faculty:

Dear Faculty Colleagues,

We hope your summer has been a good one. We write to update you on some aspects of the college’s work on prevention of and response to sexual harassment and sexual assault, and in particular to share information on your reporting obligations if you become aware of such issues.

Williams College seeks to prevent sexual harassment and sexual violence of all kinds, and to act to redress any such incidents that do occur. That commitment requires that we know about incidents that happen on our campus, so that we can (1) ensure that those who experience sexual harassment or sexual violence receive immediate professional support and guidance as to their options for legal and campus processes and for counseling, no contact orders and other accommodations (2) act to address the behavior of alleged perpetrator, the safety of the individual affected and of the campus community (3) become aware of patterns of perpetration and intervene to stop them.

1) Seems like standard stuff, in this day and age.

2) What is the best way to make trouble on this topic? I still want answers about this accusation.

Entire letter below the break:
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Two New Administrators

From a faculty friend:

From: Marlene Sandstrom
Date: Thu, Aug 30, 2018 at 10:39 PM
Subject: A hearty introduction
To: WILLIAMS-FACULTY@listserv.williams.edu

Dear Williams Community,

I am excited to announce two new members of the Williams Community.

Hannah Lipstein joins the Dean’s Office in her new role as Violence Prevention Coordinator. Hannah will be working closely with Meg Bossong, Director of Sexual Assault Response and Prevention, to extend our long-term preventative education work on campus. Hannah comes to us from a domestic violence direct service organization in Boston specifically serving the LGBTQ+ community. She also brings a wealth of expertise from her recent undergraduate experience as a student anti-violence organizer and peer advocate at Wellesley College.. We are very excited to welcome Hannah to our team.

Ivy Krofta joins us as a Peer Tutor Coordinator. Ivy will be working closely with Laura Muller, Director of Quantitative Skills Programs and Peer Support, to manage the day to day operations of our Peer Academic Support Network. Ivy is a 2013 graduate of MCLA with a degree in degree in English/Communications. She studied Spanish at the International Language Institute in Northampton, and is certified as an ESL educator. Some of you may know Ivy from her long time work at Bonnie Lea Farm. Ivy’s home base will be in in the Academic Resource Center (2nd floor of Paresky)

Please join me in welcoming Hannah and Ivy to Williams.

All best wishes,

Marlene

Marlene J. Sandstrom
Dean of the College and Hales Professor of Psychology
Williams College
Phone: (413) 597-4261
Fax: (413) 597-3507

Is there any amount of hiring that would make the trustees, ask: “How many people do you really need to run Williams?”

My recommendation is the same as always: Fewer administrators and more faculty involvement in administration.

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student pronouns

Are my “friends” on the faculty punking me, sending me absurd parodies of Administration e-mails which make me seem stupidly naive for publishing them? Latest example:

From: “Buell, Denise”
Date: August 28, 2018 at 5:57:17 PM GMT+2
To: WILLIAMS-FACULTY@LISTSERV.WILLIAMS.EDU
Subject: student pronouns
Reply-To: “Buell, Denise”

Dear Colleagues,

Williams College is committed to building a community where everyone is a full member. Part of this commitment involves acknowledging gender diversity on campus and respectfully addressing our students and peers. How we practice language matters, and being attentive to what pronouns we use allows us to respect the multi-faceted identities of our community members. Everyone has the right to be addressed as they should be, and we leave that to each individual to determine.

With this in mind, we are pleased to announce that the Office of Institutional Technology and the Registrar’s Office are working to facilitate appropriate pronoun identification for faculty, students and staff. The first step in this process has been to give students the option to submit their pronouns in PeopleSoft, and to make student pronouns available to faculty on class rosters in PeopleSoft as well as to academic advisors in their Advisor Center/My Advisee section. (Please note that at this time, they will not be available via GLOW.)

The process for students is simple. Students will select pronouns per instructions provided to them by the Registrar’s Office. A student’s pronoun will be indicated on the class roster in PeopleSoft under a “pronoun” column. When or if a student changes pronouns at any point during the term (even after add/drop), faculty instructors and academic advisors will receive an email notification from PeopleSoft indicating that one or more students submitted a pronoun update, and they will be directed to their roster.

For now, this change will take place at the student level. The Office of Institutional Technology, Human Resources, and the Registrar’s Office are working diligently to ensure that the pronoun identification process can be made available for faculty and staff. This is an effort that will take some time, and that is greatly impacted by the technological limitations of our current systems. Faculty and staff will be notified of these forthcoming changes as they occur.

As Faculty, one of our key teaching responsibilities is to create inclusive learning communities. In our classrooms, we set examples for students everyday for how to engage each other with respect. As you know, the way we speak to others matter and can make a profound difference in someone’s life. As you consider strategies for pronoun use, you may find the accompanying list of resources below helpful.

If you have any additional questions or need additional information, please contact any member of the Offices of the Dean of the Faculty, Institutional Diversity and Equity, and the Registrar.

best,

Denise K. Buell

Office of the Dean of the Faculty

You may find the following resources helpful:

A guide to pronoun practices at Williams, which includes lists of existing pronoun choices, as well as strategies for pronoun use.

See also Some helpful information about Name Change Policies on the Registrar’s website.

And, many have found the “‘Ask Me’: What LGBTQ Students Want Their Professors to Know” to be an especially handy resource.

We would also like to share below the following information that the Office of the Registrar has provided to students to help guide them in their practices.

Why should I select a pronoun?

Informing the community of your pronouns helps everyone address you appropriately and respects everyone’s right to be addressed as they should be.

What are the pronoun choices?

The following list is not exhaustive.

she/her/hers
he/him/his
they/them/theirs
ze/zir/zirs
zhe/zher/zhers
name/name/name (e.g. Kris would like Kris’ things for Kris)

other (fill in the blank with your pronoun choice.)

Some pronouns dos and don’ts:

Do!

DO-If you would like to ask someone’s pronoun, start by offering your pronoun first, “Hi, I’m ____. I use the pronouns ____. What about you?” It is good practice to ask which pronouns a person uses, instead of assuming.

DO-Understand that some people are not comfortable sharing their pronouns. Some people would prefer that you call them by their name. This is particularly true for some people who may feel they are being asked to share information that they are not ready to share.

DO-Be patient with yourself and others. If you make a mistake, apologize, make the correction and move on.

Don’t!

DON’T-Refer to pronouns such as “they/them/their” or “ze/zir/zirs” as “gender-neutral pronouns.” While some people identify as gender-neutral, many don’t see themselves as gendered, but as gender nonconforming. Better language is “non-binary pronouns.”

DON’T- Describe the pronouns someone uses as “preferred pronouns.” It is not a preference. The pronouns that a person uses are their pronouns and the only ones that should be used for them.

DON’T-Say “male pronouns” and “female pronouns.” Pronouns are not necessarily tied to someone’s gender identity: some people use “he/him/his” or “she/her/hers,” but do not identify as male or female, respectively.

If Denise Buell is sending e-mails like this today, what sort of e-mails will she be sending in 15 years?

Also, what does President Mandel think about this topic?

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Not Being Welcomed, Included, or Accepted

Latest all-faculty e-mail:

From: Marlene Sandstrom
Date: Mon, Aug 13, 2018 at 2:59 PM
Subject: syllabus planning and student support
To: WILLIAMS-FACULTY@listserv.williams.edu

Dear Colleagues,

I hope this note finds you well. As we hit mid-August, many of you will begin the process of creating or updating your course syllabi. I’d like to take this opportunity to suggest a few topics for inclusion: (1) the honor code, (2) access to health/accessibility resources, and (3) inclusivity and classroom culture.


The honor code
:
Please consider including a statement about how the honor code (and academic integrity) applies to your coursework. The syllabus is a great place to introduce students to any specific requirements you have about citation, collaboration, use of resource materials, or other issues particular to your work. Even if you plan to provide specific instructions on individual assignments, including information about the honor code in the syllabus sends an important signal about the importance of academic integrity in your classroom.

In addition to outlining general expectations, consider including a statement that encourages students to ask questions if they are unsure about a particular practice or rule (e.g., “If you have any questions about how the honor code applies to your work, please come talk with me. I am always happy to have those conversations.”

One issue that has become increasing thorny for the Honor Committee over the past few years involves the nature of collaborative work. In many instances, faculty allow (and strongly encourage) students to collaborate in some ways and for some assignments, but not in others. The Honor Committee has been hearing a large number of cases in which students seem confused about what sorts of collaborative work are being encouraged, even when faculty believe they had been clear. The syllabus provides a good opportunity for clarity. Rather than providing students with a general principle (e.g., “Students may consult with other students as long as the work they turn in is their own”) you might want to consider being more specific about your expectations around collaboration. What you choose to write will vary depending on the nature of your assignments and expectations, but one example of more detailed language around collaborative work might be: “Students can exchange broad ideas or general approaches toward problem sets with other students, but may not engage in any joint writing or step-by-step problem solving. One way to be sure you are not violating the honor code is to refrain from writing/typing/crafting your response to the assignment with others. Rather, save the writing until you are on your own and working independently.”

Health/Accessibility resources:
Both students and faculty have asked about ways to ensure that students know the resources they can turn to for disabilities and other health issues that affect their academic work. We are continuing to work on improving outreach from our office directly to students regarding these resources. You may wish to include a brief pointer to appropriate resources in your syllabus. Some sample language to consider: “Students with disabilities of any kind who may need accommodations for this course are encouraged to contact Dr. GL Wallace (Director of Accessible Education) at 597-4672. Also, students experiencing mental or physical health challenges that are significantly affecting their academic work or well-being are encouraged to contact me and to speak with a dean so we can help you find the right resources. The deans can be reached at 597-4171.”

Inclusivity and classroom culture
:
You might want to consider including a statement in your syllabus that underscores your commitment to a respectful and inclusive classroom climate. Some sample language to consider: The Williams community embraces diversity of age, background, beliefs, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, and other visible and nonvisible categories. I welcome all students in this course and expect that all students contribute to a respectful, welcoming and inclusive environment. If you feel that you are not being welcomed, included, or accepted in this class, please come to me or a college administrator to share your concern.

Many thanks to the faculty members who have contributed to the suggested language provided here. Please use whatever you find helpful, and feel free to share additional ideas with me, so that I can pass them along to others.. Also, feel free to get in touch if you’d like to discuss any of these issues further. Meanwhile, I hope you enjoy the rest of your summer. May time slow down for these last few weeks, and may late August be restorative!

All best wishes,

Marlene

Marlene J. Sandstrom
Dean of the College and Hales Professor of Psychology

1) Isn’t it pretty stupid for every single syllabus to include the exact same language about these issues? Don’t we have a student handbook or some other common means to cover these topics?

2) Put yourself in the shoes of a junior faculty member. The Dean of the College asks you to “consider” using this in your syllabus:

If you feel that you are not being welcomed, included, or accepted in this class, please come to me or a college administrator to share your concern.

Emphasis added. What choice do you have but to include this sniveling invitation to every trouble-making snitch?

3) We have some faculty readers. Will you be including this (newish?) language in your syllabi? Do you think your junior colleagues feel compelled to?

4) What are the standards by which we might determine if a student is, objectively, being “accepted” in a class? Is it possible to be welcomed and included, but not accepted?

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Information for Returning Upperclass Students – Fall 2018

Dear Students,
I hope you are having a wonderful summer.  We are busy planning for fall – just a few more weeks until the Class of 2022 arrives – and I’m very much looking forward to your return to campus and to our community.
There are many questions you may have brewing at this point – about keys and cars and transportation and room openings and many other things.  We have a website which we hope will offer most of the answers, here.  Of course, if none of these links answer your questions, we are here and happy to talk and figure things out.
I’m wishing you a joyful remainder of your summer and safe travel back to Williamstown.
All best,
Dean Sandstrom
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Update from the Committee on Priorities and Resources

From a faculty source:

The Committee on Priorities and Resources (CPR) would like to thank all of you who came to the open forum earlier this month and shared your thoughts about the college’s priorities, values, and commitments.

Some of your comments underscored the importance of issues that the committee has been considering carefully. These include how the college should meet its sustainability goals of reducing emissions to 35 percent below 1990 levels by 2020 and achieving carbon neutrality by the end of 2020. Considerable attention has also been given not just to on-going construction projects, but also to how the college should decide what, when, and how to build. A report on the college’s building process can be found here. Possible changes to our admission and financial aid policies have also been discussed. Other thoughts, particularly those about staff salary and compensation, pointed to issues that should and will be put on the committee’s agenda.

To provide more regular opportunities for faculty, staff, and students to communicate ideas and concerns to the committee, CPR is creating a webpage and will be holding more open forums next year. In the meantime, we encourage you to contact the committee using this form.

We look forward to hearing from you,

Pei-Wen Chen, Biology
Todd Hoffman, Budget Director
Steve Klass, VP for Campus Life
Dukes Love, Provost
Megan Morey, VP for College Relations
Fred Puddester, VP for Finance and Administration
Michael Rubel ’19
Matt Sheehy, Associate VP for Finance
Jim Shepard, English
Allegra Simon ’18
Eiko Maruko Siniawer, History, Chair of CPR
Tara Watson, Economics and Public Health
Chris Winters, Associate Provost
Weitao Zhu ’18

Chair Eiko Siniawer wasn’t able to share details about the “[p]ossible changes to our admission and financial aid policies” but she did note that CPR would be publishing a report in May. Thanks Eiko!

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Transnational Solidarity Wall Statement

Front

CISA, IC, SJP, VISTA ISSUE JOINT STATEMENT ON MOCK WALL

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

On Tuesday morning, Williams College woke up to find a wall on Paresky lawn. The wall consists of wooden panels with artwork that draws attention to the similarities between the Israeli apartheid wall in the West Bank and the US/Mexico border wall. It is a collective project between Coalition for Immigrant Student Advancement (CISA), International Club (IC), Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP), and Vista. By putting up a mock wall on the center of campus, interrupting the space between Paresky and Sawyer, we hope to force our fellow students to reflect on the impact of walls like these– and all militarized borders– on the daily existence of millions of people. While this mock wall does not significantly impede students at Williams, in reality walls are life-threatening structures that encroach on the everyday lives of communities from Palestine to Latin America and beyond. From Palestinian women giving birth at checkpoints, to loved ones being separated for decades, to ICE detention centers and deportations, walls violently oppress those who live behind and across them.

As students committed to justice, we know that Israel’s apartheid wall and Trump’s border wall in the United States are two sides of the same coin of white supremacy and settler colonial violence. Through our mock wall on Paresky lawn, we hope that students feel encouraged to build knowledge, break the silence surrounding these issues, and begin to take action together. We stand in solidarity with members of our community who are personally affected by militarized borders, and we stand in solidarity with struggles for liberation, and particularly indigenous resistance, everywhere.

To complement the wall, we are organizing a talk with Professor Amal Eqeiq and a journalist and activist in Gaza on the topic of contemporary protests in Gaza and Transnational Solidarity from Mexico and Palestine this Wednesday at 5PM in Hopkins 002. How can we tear down walls from Mexico to Palestine? What does it mean to resist and build solidarity across borders? What is going in Gaza right now and how are they affected by borders? This talk will interrogate these questions and will be followed by a vigil to mourn and commemorate lives lost at border crossings and protests. Dinner will be served. Bring questions and a friend!

Finally, please join us to TEAR DOWN THE WALL on Tuesday, May 1st at 12PM on Paresky lawn. #MexicoToPalestine #BuildBridgesNotWalls #LongLiveInternationalSolidarity

 
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Report to the Community

To the Williams Community,

Every year I write to the community with an annual summary of our work to prevent and respond to gender-based violence. Williams is deeply committed to the goal of fostering and sustaining a safe community for all of our members. When members of our community are harmed, we seek to provide the resources they need in order to achieve accountability, healing, and support.

I want to start by thanking the many students, staff, faculty, and alumni who are working to improve our prevention and response efforts every day. Addressing the problem of sexual and intimate violence demands the involvement of everyone who cares about Williams and our community. Thank you for all that you do to contribute to that effort.

Making a formal report and engaging the college disciplinary process is one way of seeking support. I summarize the community’s use of this process below. Even when individuals choose not to pursue a disciplinary process in response to intimate violence or harassment, there are a number of other systems and resources in place to provide support. Talking with someone who can listen and make connections to useful resources is an essential part of healing and accountability. In addition, we can provide assistance for a wide array of specific concerns, including finding a different room to live in, feeling safe around campus, navigating relationships after violence, and managing assignments or class attendance. Nobody should feel that they must contend with any of these challenges on their own; we are here to help with these and any other resources or measures you need.

In the majority of instances, students can have conversations about what happened, what options are available, and what steps they are considering with any trusted college staff member without beginning a formal conduct or complaint process. This includes deans, staff from the Davis Center or the Office of Student Life, Campus Safety officers, the Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Coordinators, coaches, or professors.

Confidential resources include SASS Survivor Services. SASS is staffed around the clock by specially-trained people (Meg Bossong, Jen Chuks, Donna Denelli-Hess, Carolina Echenique, and Mike Evans) who can provide support, help you access resources, or offer information about options. Other confidential resources on and off campus include Integrative Wellbeing and Health Services; the college chaplains; and the Elizabeth Freeman Center, which is the local rape crisis center and domestic violence organization and also has a 24/7 hotline.

2016-17 Conduct Cases

In the 2016-2017 school year, the college received a total of 16 formal reports of misconduct:

  • 6 reports of sexual misconduct;
  • 3 reports of relationship abuse;
  • 4 reports of stalking; and
  • 3 reports of sexual harassment.

Of these 16 cases, 13 involved situations in which the person alleged to have caused harm was a current member of the college community and was therefore eligible for college accountability processes. The other three involved individuals who were not current members of the Williams community. In those instances, the college helped students seek accountability through other institutions or in the courts.

Among the students in the 13 cases involving Williams community members, five chose to take part in the college investigation and adjudication process. Their cases were adjudicated between July 1, 2016, and June 30, 2017. This includes two sexual misconduct complaints, two cases involving relationship abuse, and one complaint involving sexual harassment.

Of the sexual misconduct cases that were investigated and adjudicated, one resulted in a finding of responsibility, and one resulted in a finding of not responsible. Both cases of relationship abuse resulted in findings of responsibility.

The student found responsible for sexual misconduct was separated from the college with a suspension for four semesters.

One of the students found responsible for relationship abuse was suspended for one semester; the other was placed on disciplinary probation and completed an educational sanction.

The one individual found responsible for sexual harassment was an employee who is no longer employed by the college.

Category of Conduct Cases Pursued in Discipline Process/
Total Eligible Cases Received
Findings of Responsibility
Sexual Assault 2/5 1
Relationship abuse 2/3 2
Stalking 0/4 n/a
Sexual Harassment 1/1 1

Occasionally an adjudication process continues past the cutoff date for reporting on the academic year within which the case was reported. In such instances, we include the case in reporting data for the year during which adjudication was completed.

I also want to point out that individuals who have not yet chosen to pursue an investigation and adjudication process still have that option available to them as long as the person they might be lodging a complaint against is still a current student, staff member, or faculty member. The college does not have the authority to hold individuals accountable once they are no longer members of the community (for example, after they graduate, transfer, or terminate their employment at Williams). In those situations, individuals still have the option of lodging a complaint with law enforcement until the applicable statute of limitations is reached.

In closing, I want to again thank everyone working to improve our prevention and response efforts.

Sincerely,

Marlene Sandstrom

Dean of the College and Hales Professor of Psychology

All of Williams’ policies and information about resources for support of students, staff, and faculty can be found at http://titleix.williams.edu/

Marlene J. Sandstrom

Dean of the College and Hales Professor of Psychology

Williams College

Phone: (413) 597-4261

Fax: (413) 597-3507

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Williams Reads Book Announcement and 2019-2020 Book Selection

The Williams Reads Committee and the Committee on Community and Diversity are proud to announce that the Williams Reads book for 2018-19 will be ‘Sing, Unburied, Sing’ by Jesmyn Ward. Stay tuned for details on programming related to this wonderful book. The kickoff event will begin on September 3rd, 2018 when first year students, JAs, faculty, and staff will join together to discuss the book.

Believe it or not, it is already time to think ahead to the 2019-2020 academic year! The Williams Reads Committee wants your help in selecting the book for the year after next. What should our community read together? Please share ideas for books via this Google Form.

Thank you,
Marlene J. Sandstrom
Dean of the College and Hales Professor of Psychology
Williams College
Phone: (413) 597-4261
Fax: (413) 597-3507
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Committee on Priorities and Resources Open Forum

From: Eiko Maruko Siniawer
Date: Wed, Mar 14, 2018 at 9:14 AM
Subject: Open Forum on College Priorities
To: WILLIAMS-FACULTY@listserv.williams.edu

Dear colleagues,

The Committee on Priorities and Resources (CPR) invites you to attend an Open Forum for faculty, staff, and students on Thursday, April 5, at 4:00 pm in Griffin 6. We’d like to have an open discussion of the college’s priorities, so we hope that you’ll come with your thoughts about how the college has been, and should be, allocating our resources. What should be the college’s most important commitments? What is most central to the mission of the college, and how does our spending align with our priorities?

There will be introductory remarks by Dukes Love and Fred Puddester. But the forum will be dedicated to your ideas and questions about anything from financial aid to building on campus. The members of CPR hope that you can attend the forum and be part of this conversation.

We look forward to seeing you on the 5th,

Pei-Wen Chen, Biology
Todd Hoffman, Budget Director
Steve Klass, VP for Campus Life
Dukes Love, Provost
Megan Morey, VP for College Relations
Fred Puddester, VP for Finance and Administration
Michael Rubel ’19
Matt Sheehy, Associate VP for Finance
Jim Shepard, English
Allegra Simon ’18
Eiko Maruko Siniawer, History, Chair of CPR
Tara Watson, Economics and Public Health
Chris Winters, Associate Provost
Weitao Zhu ’18

1) I am still sad that Eiko was not picked as the next Williams president. She would have been great! Anyone have gossip as to whether or not she (or Lee Park) was among the finalists in the search?

2) My sense is that the CPR is one of the more powerful committees on campus. Insider commentary welcome.

3) My guess is that such a forum will generate a fair amount of bleating about too-low faculty salaries/benefits. Or am I being unfair?

4) The college spends way too little money on improving the quality of our students, especially black/Hispanic/poor admittees that choose Harvard/Yale/Princeton/Stanford over us. My questions to CPR would be:

a) Why don’t we match the financial aid offers from HYPS, at least for highly desirable URM/low-income applicants? My sense is that we often expect “middle class” students to pay tens of thousands of dollars more then they have too pay at HYPS. Is that true? How much would it cost to fix?

b) Why don’t we increase the funds devoted to Tyng Scholarships and focus those awards more on the most desirable applicants, especially African-Americans?

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JAAB Statement on the Future of the JA System

Dear members of the Williams community,

If you’re not a first-year now, you were a first-year once. The Junior Advisor (JA) system has played a role in all of our Williams experiences in some way. That’s why we, as the Junior Advisor Advisory Board (JAAB), feel strongly that starting a conversation about the future of the JA system with the larger Williams community is vital at this moment.

Over the past few years, we’ve heard many valid criticisms of the JA system. Examples include: JAs taking on undue emotional labor, the unfair burden placed on JAs of color, and the financial stress experienced by low-income JAs, among others. For these reasons, and others, JA applicant numbers have been steadily decreasing for the past few years, with this year’s numbers at an all-time low.

We will not have the traditional cohort of 52 JAs to the Class of 2022. We worked hard to reorganize the system, and there will still be a JA system and an entry system next year. However, it will look significantly different than it has in the past. This includes changes such as:

  • JA teams of 3 and 4
  • Larger “double” entries (e.g. Sage A/B and Mills/Dennett 3)
  • Strengthening the relationship between the Deans and JAs

We hope that the JA teams and larger entries will alleviate some of the emotional burden currently placed on JAs. However, this will not fully solve the problem: we as a community must also change our expectations around the JA position.

Originally, JAs were intended to serve as “informal counselors and mediators, … friends, who just happen to know the lay of the land.” Now, JAs struggle to support all of their frosh while balancing the responsibility of being full-time students and members of the community. We want to change this narrative –– not by returning to how things used to be, but by working together to move forward in a more sustainable and productive direction.

We as a community need to affirm that JAs are here to serve as mediators, links to resources, and friends –– nothing more, nothing less. If significant changes aren’t made, then future first-years may experience a Williams without a JA system. It’s important for us in this moment to reckon with the alternative, which would most likely be an RA system in which students recruited by the College oversee all first-year dorms.

Over the next few weeks, we invite you to make your voice heard on this issue –– and we sincerely hope that you will. The week of April 2nd will be “JA Week”, organized by JAAB and the Gargoyle Society, dedicated to thinking about the future of the JA system. In addition, feel free to reach out to any JAAB member with thoughts or ideas. We want the JA system to survive and thrive, but it won’t without the support of our community.

Sincerely,

JAAB

Jesse Facey, JAAB Co-President
Jad Hamdan, JAAB Co-President
Brian Benítez
Jason Adulley
Austin Anderson
Brad Clark
Claudia Forrester
Sumun Iyer
Zeke King-Phillips, MinCo Representative
Emmy Maluf
Ben Metrikin
Chetan Patel
Chrisleine Temple
Darla Torres
Kyle Walker

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Welcome to a new semester at Williams

To the Williams community,

Welcome to the new semester! I share with all of you the excitement and sense of possibility that accompanies these moments every year. There’s a certain comfort in the familiar rhythm of the academic calendar, at a time when so much around us seems to defy predictability.

I’m also happy to point out that, for the first time, this start of semester message is going out to our 28,000-plus alumni and to families, as well as to campus. The Williams community reaches far beyond Williamstown, and we want to recognize that by including you all.

I’m honored to be doing so in my new role. As interim president I look forward to contributing in new and positive ways to Williams’ evolution. That growth requires us to focus on teaching and learning while staying connected to life outside the Purple Valley. In fact, it’s becoming ever more important that we engage with each other to build community out of diversity.

We’ll set aside tomorrowFebruary 1, for that purpose. On the 10th annual Claiming Williams Day, I invite staff, students, and faculty to attend and participate in some of the many scheduled campus events. And I hope our alumni and families will also be with us in spirit, wherever you are. The Williams community thrives when we invest in such efforts together.

Here are other examples from across the college of what’s possible when we work as partners:

  • The Presidential Search Committee is progressing in their efforts to help Williams recruit our 18th president. The Committee includes trustees, faculty, staff, alumni, and current students—a true community-wide endeavor.
  • We’re celebrating the granting of tenure to a new cohort of four extraordinary faculty membersacross all three divisions.
  • The Dean’s office has hired two impressive new associate deans, April Ruiz and Chris Sewell ’05, as part of our commitment to supporting every student’s success and thriving.
  • Finally, this spring we’ll move into the new laboratory research building in the Science Center, thanks to outstanding collaboration among faculty, students, staff, and generous alumni.
These accomplishments and others like them exemplify the community-wide spirit guiding our work at Williams. Such a spirit has to be nurtured. With that in mind, I look forward to many community conversations, on campus and off, in the coming months, and to hearing your perspectives on how we can make Williams an even better place for all of us.

Sincerely,

Tiku Majumder
Interim President

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Message from Board Chair Eisenson: Honoring Adam Falk with two campus namings

To the Williams Community,

I am pleased to report that, at last week’s meeting, the Board of Trustees unanimously voted to honor Adam Falk, our 17th president, by naming the Science Quad in his honor. The decision continues a Williams tradition of naming important public spaces in honor of our past presidents.

In addition, a group of current and former Trustees and other generous donors have endowed the directorship of the Center for Learning in Action (CLiA) in Adam’s name. The Adam Falk Directorship is a tribute to his founding support for the Center, which engaged more than 800 Williams students in projects across our community and region this year alone.

The naming of the Adam Falk Science Quad will be formalized during the opening of the new Science Center. The naming of CLiA’s Falk Directorship goes into effect immediately, with current director Paula Consolini thus becoming the Center’s first Falk Director.

The Science Center project and CLiA are both examples of the transformative work this community accomplished under Adam’s leadership. We are delighted to be able to recognize Adam’s substantial contributions as our president in these important and lasting ways, as we wish him well in his new post.

Sincerely,

Michael R. Eisenson ’77
Chair of the Board of Trustees

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Martin Luther King Jr. Day is Monday, January 15

Williams staff, faculty and students,

I wanted to take this moment to point out that, in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Williams will treat next Monday, January 15, as a day of no classes. Administrative offices will also be closed.

variety of activities are planned throughout the week. Please join me in taking the time to celebrate Dr. King’s legacy, and to dedicate ourselves to continuing his quest for equality and justice.

Just a few weeks after MLK Day will come the tenth anniversary of Claiming Williams. Both events offer important opportunities for us to reflect on the connections between a Williams education and our responsibilities to the world in which we live.

Thank you to the faculty for setting aside next Monday from the academic calendar, to the many people involved in planning this year’s events, and to all of you for your important contributions to our campus community and the wider world around us.

Tiku Majumder

Interim President
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A new year, and a new phase

Greetings from the President’s Office, and happy new year!

I wanted to let you know, as I finish my first week in my new role as interim president, how much I’m looking forward to working with you all. Adam Falk set Williams on a strong path back into fiscal health; supported our curriculum through investments in our faculty, programs, and academic buildings; and strengthened our community through his commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Even considering the financial health and strong foundation he established, there’s much we’ll need to accomplish together. With that in mind I’m particularly eager to begin discussions with faculty and staff colleagues to inform the agenda for my tenure. While this undertaking will certainly involve close attention to the academic program and our support for students, the ways in which we choose to approach it must be informed by conversations with you who are engaged with this work every day.

Students have an essential role in defining this community. So I’m also eager to step beyond my more familiar role as teacher and advisor, to partner with College Council, MinCo, the JAs, and others to create a Williams that’s both welcoming and enriching, in ways that will foster the best possible education.

Even after more than two decades on the Williams faculty and many years as director of the Science Center, the presidency is showing me a side of the college that I’d previously had little opportunity to observe firsthand. Indeed, the view from my new office is quite different in many ways! I feel fortunate to step into my new job with the support of an outstanding leadership team, and the benefit of close relationships with so many of you. I look forward to strengthening those bonds and forming new ones in the months to come.

Sincerely,

Tiku Majumder
Interim President and Barclay Jermain Professor of Natural Philosophy

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Log Update

Dear Williams Community,

I’m writing to let you know that Hops & Vines will no longer be providing food and beverage service at The Log as of December 29th. After that date, the Log will go on hiatus (except for the CES Log Lunch program on Fridays) while we work on transitioning to a new foodservice vendor. Hops & Vines helped the college immensely by taking on the opening of a new hospitality operation and running it for us for two years. The restaurant business is a notoriously challenging one, and I want to personally thank the whole Hops & Vines team for their efforts.

As soon as we became aware of their plans to turn the operation back over to us, we began seeking a new operator, and we’re now in advanced negotiations with a locally-owned business who will be a terrific match. I look forward to announcing that news very soon, with the goal of reopening a few weeks thereafter. Unfortunately, we’ll need to shut down the venue in the interim so that the kitchen equipment and service workspaces can be modified to support the new foodservice operation.

The Log is one of Williams’ most distinctive and beloved spaces, and many staff from across campus are working hard to return it to full operating mode as soon as possible. I look forward to announcing the new food and beverage team who will help us build on the foundation of these first two years of operation, further shaping The Log into the gathering-place we want it to be for the whole Williams community.

Sincerely,

Steve Klass, Vice President for Campus Life

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Presidential search update

To the Williams community,

I write in my role as chair of the college’s Presidential Search Committee, to provide you with an update on the ongoing search process.

Many of you responded to the committee’s invitation to provide input on the search. Almost 1,700 members of our community responded to the survey emailed to all of you. Our search firm, Spencer Stuart, has received a further 135 emails from faculty, staff, students, alumni, and friends of the college so far. And many faculty, staff, and students also attended one of the twelve forums held on campus this semester, along with small-group discussions.

The committee reviewed all of this input at our fall meetings, and continues to consider contributions received through the search website. I want to thank everyone who took the time to provide insights into the qualities we should emphasize in our search, or to suggest potential candidates for the position of president. We are grateful for your help.

The committee has now posted the prospectus on the search website. The prospectus is the detailed job description provided to potential candidates for the presidency. It was developed with attention to the community input from this fall, and I encourage you to read it as time allows. Special thanks go to committee member and John Hawley Roberts Professor of English Peter Murphy for leading its development, and to the authors of prospectuses from prior searches, which provided the foundation for our document. I believe it is quite thoughtfully done.

We are now moving into the most time-intensive and most confidential phase of the search, as we identify potential candidates and begin a series of in-depth interviews. Presidential searches require a high level of confidentiality so that the best candidates will come forward with a willingness to engage in conversation. As a result, the committee will not have a great deal of information to communicate publicly between now and the announcement of a president. The members will have much work to do behind the scenes during this time, however. I hope you will continue to support them, as colleagues and friends, in their efforts on Williams’ behalf.

The williamspresident@spencerstuart.com address will remain open throughout the search process and we encourage you to use it if you have thoughts that you would like to share. While the demands of the search process make it impossible to answer individual messages, all will be read.

My colleagues and I appreciate your contributions, and your commitment to helping us find the best person to serve as Williams’ 18th president.

Yours,

Michael Eisenson ’77
Chair, Presidential Search Committee

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