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How much is too much?

It looks like Hal Steinbrenner ’91 is not quite as publicity shy as I previously believed. With NY Yankee captain Derek Jeter playing out his contract, the team is faced with the dilemma of how much to offer him for his next contract. As noted in this article, the negotiations could get a little messy:

But Steinbrenner was unable to put a time frame on how long negotiations would take or hazard a guess on how smoothly they would go. “Who knows?” he said. “You just never know with these things. Both parties need to be happy with the deal, and that may make things more complicated, I don’t know.

“There’s always the possibility that things could get messy.”

Steinbrenner is facing a difficult decision. From a purely “objective” perspective, Jeter is highly unlikely to be “worth” anything close to the $18 million per year he has been earning on a going forward basis. He’s 36 years old, plays a position where very few play productively into their late ’30’s and early 40’s, and is already showing signs of decline:

Jeter, 36, is coming off the worst overall season of his 16-year major league career. His .270 batting average, the lowest since he became a regular in 1996, is 44 points below his career batting average and represents a 64-point drop from his 2009 production, when he hit .334. His 179 hits matched the lowest total since his injury-shortened 2003 season, and his .340 on-base percentage was the lowest since his rookie season of 1995.

On the other hand, he is the most revered Yankee since Mickey Mantle, I would guess (Yankee fans should weigh in here, since I am a lifelong Red Sox fan and am certainly not qualified to opine on this subject). He’s almost certainly a first ballot Hall of Famer, and the Yankees have nothing if not tons of money.

The best solution, I suppose would be a short term contact which could keep Jeter’s salary close to where it is now, without the team assuming an undue risk of a total performance meltdown, but I don’t know whether Jeter would take something like that. Perhaps a 4-year, $40 million contact might do the trick.

What do Yankee fans think? What should Hal do?

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Yankees Win

Professor Sam Crane and I disagree about a lot of things, but we were both happy to see the Yankees win the World Series. Here is Hal Steinbrenner ’91, who has taken over as managing partner from his father, George Steinbrenner ’52.

Let me repeat my offer from last year.

Are you an Eph interested in being a sports writer? Write for EphBlog! We have hundreds of readers per day and your beat would be the New York Yankees (and Hal Steinbrenner ‘91). If you don’t take up this offer, then you probably don’t really want to be a sports writer. And, who know, you might even get a book out of it, as Derek Charles Catsam ‘93 did from his Red Sox Diary series.

And, if not the Yankees, then the Patriots or the Pirates. And, if not sports, then Senator Udall or soon-to-be Senator Coakley.

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More Reserved

Meet the new boss, Eph like the old Boss.

Hal Steinbrenner [’91], the younger and more reserved of the Steinbrenner sons, was given control of the Yankees on Thursday in a unanimous vote by Major League Baseball owners. George Steinbrenner [’52], the Yankees’ principal owner, asked Commissioner Bud Selig to pursue the change last month.

Hal Steinbrenner, responsible for the business and financial side of the Yankees, was handed control of the team Thursday.

While Hank Steinbrenner, George’s older son, has been much more talkative about the Yankees in his frequent interviews, Hal has been more involved in the daily operations of the team. It is Hal, not Hank, who deals with team executives and spends considerable time in the Yankees’ offices in New York.

“I realize it’s a great responsibility,” Hal Steinbrenner said. “My dad is, needless to say, a tough act to follow. But I’m going to do it to the best of my ability and give it my all every day.”

Good luck to Hal.

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rhinoceros steinbrennerus tampafloridus

An update from the New York Times on the Eph Steinbrenner’s: George ’52 and Hal ’91.

Shhh. Don’t disturb him. Let him trample through the marshland undisturbed. You may take photographs and video and audio to your heart’s content, but please do not do anything harmful to this endangered species.

For a while, there were fears we were losing the awesome roars and fearsome wallowing and general flailing of the dangerous “upright keratinous horns on the snout” (to quote the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary). This impressive mammal seemed on the verge of extinction, a victim of enlightenment and manners and corporate groupspeak.

I am speaking here of rhinoceros steinbrennerus tampafloridus, a rare breed apparently making a comeback in its native habitat. The beast is back, in the person of Hank Steinbrenner, Rhino the Elder, not to be confused with Hal Steinbrenner, Rhino the Younger.

Are you an Eph interested in being a sports writer? Write for EphBlog! We have hundreds of readers per day and your beat would be the New York Yankees (and Hal Steinbrenner ’91). If you don’t take up this offer, then you probably don’t really want to be a sports writer. And, who know, you might even get a book out of it, as Derek Charles Catsam ’93 did from his Red Sox Diary series.

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Currently browsing posts filed under "Hal Steinbrenner ’91"

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