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Yard By Yard

More than fifty years ago, Ephs took the field against Amherst.

Saturday, they do the same. And ten years from now. And one hundred. Do our Eph football players recognize their history? Do you?

TB Jones ’58 (my father’s roommate) played varsity squash at Williams. I remember seeing his picture in one of the many team photos that used to line the walls of the old gym. Walking by those old photographs each day for practice provided me with a great sense of the history that I was becoming a part of. Years later, those emotions were perfectly captured by Robin Williams in “The Dead Poet’s Society” when he takes his class to view the pictures of past students at their fictional New England prep school.

From the script:

Keating turns towards the trophy cases, filled with trophies, footballs, and team pictures.

KEATING: “Now I would like you to step forward over here and peruse some of the faces from the past. You’ve walked past them many times. I don’t think you’ve really looked at them.”

The students slowly gather round the cases and Keating moves behind them.

KEATING: “They’re not that different from you, are they? Same haircuts. Full of hormones, just like you. Invincible, just like you feel. The world is their oyster. They believe they’re destined for great things, just like many of you. Their eyes are full of hope, just like you. Did they wait until it was too late to make from their lives even one iota of what they were capable? Because you see gentlmen, these boys are now fertilizing daffodils. But if you listen real close, you can hear them whisper their legacy to you. Go on, lean in.”

The boys lean in and Keating hovers over Cameron’s shoulder.

KEATING (whispering in a gruff voice): “Carpe.”

Cameron looks over his shoulder with an aggravated expression on his face.

KEATING: “Hear it?” (whispering again) “Carpe. Carpe Diem. Seize the day boys, make your lives extraordinary.”

The boys stare at the faces in the cabinet in silence.

Decades from now there will be another young man at Williams who will walk down those halls on his way to practice. Perhaps he will play squash like TB Jones and I did (although I hope that he plays more like TB than like me). Whatever his future might hold, I hope that he sees our pictures and wonders about us, about where we went from Williams and how prepared we were for the journey. I hope that he realizes how fortunate he is.

Does football coach Mark Raymond remind his players of the history of those who have gone before? Does he know their names and their stories?

I hope so.

Williams may win or lose on Saturday. If victory comes, it will be sweet indeed since we have lost to Amherst for 6 straight years. A win would also (probably) prevent Amherst from winning NESCAC and give the Ephs a share of the Little Three title. Did Frank Uible ’57 win or lose the games he played against Amherst more than 50 year ago? In the longer sweep of history, one game, one loss, is as dust in the corridors of memory. What matters is the day itself, and the place we each occupy within the traditions of the Williams community.

No one remembers the score of the game these men played 100 years ago. But we look in their faces and see ourselves.

I am Frank Uible ’57. Who are you?

[Thanks to EphBlog regular “nuts” and Williams Sports Information for the photos. Note that the original post in this series did not include a YouTube clip because YouTube did not exist. Old Time is still a-flying.]

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Yard By Yard

More than fifty years ago, Ephs took the field against Wesleyan.

Tomorrow, they do the same. And ten years from now. And one hundred. Do our Eph football players recognize their history? Do you?

TB Jones ’58 (my father’s roommate) played varsity squash at Williams. I remember seeing his picture in one of the many team photos that used to line the walls of the old gym. Walking by those old photographs each day for practice provided me with a great sense of the history that I was becoming a part of. Years later, those emotions were perfectly captured by Robin Williams in “The Dead Poet’s Society” when he takes his class to view the pictures of past students at their fictional New England prep school.

From the script:

Keating turns towards the trophy cases, filled with trophies, footballs, and team pictures.

KEATING: “Now I would like you to step forward over here and peruse some of the faces from the past. You’ve walked past them many times. I don’t think you’ve really looked at them.”

The students slowly gather round the cases and Keating moves behind them.

KEATING: “They’re not that different from you, are they? Same haircuts. Full of hormones, just like you. Invincible, just like you feel. The world is their oyster. They believe they’re destined for great things, just like many of you. Their eyes are full of hope, just like you. Did they wait until it was too late to make from their lives even one iota of what they were capable? Because you see gentlmen, these boys are now fertilizing daffodils. But if you listen real close, you can hear them whisper their legacy to you. Go on, lean in.”

The boys lean in and Keating hovers over Cameron’s shoulder.

KEATING (whispering in a gruff voice): “Carpe.”

Cameron looks over his shoulder with an aggravated expression on his face.

KEATING: “Hear it?” (whispering again) “Carpe. Carpe Diem. Seize the day boys, make your lives extraordinary.”

The boys stare at the faces in the cabinet in silence.

Decades from now there will be another young man at Williams who will walk down those halls on his way to practice. Perhaps he will play squash like TB Jones and I did (although I hope that he plays more like TB than like me). Whatever his future might hold, I hope that he sees our pictures and wonders about us, about where we went from Williams and how prepared we were for the journey. I hope that he realizes how fortunate he is.

Does new football coach Mark Raymond remind his players of the history of those who have gone before? Does he know their names and their stories?

I hope so.

Williams may win or lose tomorrow. Given the fact that the team has struggled all season, that the seniors have lost at Homecoming every year that they have been at Williams and that Wesleyan comes into the game as one of the top teams in NESCAC, a victory tomorrow would be one of the sweetest in years, all the more so because no (?) neutral observer gives Williams any chance at all.

Did Frank Uible ’57 win or lose the games he played against Wesleyan more than 50 year ago? In the longer sweep of history, one game, one loss, is as dust in the corridors of memory. What matters is the day itself, and the place we each occupy within the traditions of the Williams community.

No one remembers the score of the game these men played 100 years ago. But we look in their faces and see ourselves.

I am Frank Uible ’57. Who are you?

[Thanks to EphBlog regular “nuts” and Williams Sports Information for the photos. Note that the original post in this series did not include a YouTube clip because YouTube did not exist. Old Time is still a-flying.]

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Yard by Yard

More than fifty years ago, Ephs took the field against Amherst.

Tomorrow, they do the same. And ten years from now. And one hundred. Do our Eph football players recognize their history? Do you?

TB Jones ’58 (my father’s roommate) played varsity squash at Williams. I remember seeing his picture in one of the many team photos that used to line the walls of the old gym. Walking by those old photographs each day for practice provided me with a great sense of the history that I was becoming a part of. Years later, those emotions were perfectly captured by Robin Williams in “The Dead Poet’s Society” when he takes his class to view the pictures of past students at their fictional New England prep school.

From the script:

Keating turns towards the trophy cases, filled with trophies, footballs, and team pictures.

KEATING: “Now I would like you to step forward over here and peruse some of the faces from the past. You’ve walked past them many times. I don’t think you’ve really looked at them.”

The students slowly gather round the cases and Keating moves behind them.

KEATING: “They’re not that different from you, are they? Same haircuts. Full of hormones, just like you. Invincible, just like you feel. The world is their oyster. They believe they’re destined for great things, just like many of you. Their eyes are full of hope, just like you. Did they wait until it was too late to make from their lives even one iota of what they were capable? Because you see gentlmen, these boys are now fertilizing daffodils. But if you listen real close, you can hear them whisper their legacy to you. Go on, lean in.”

The boys lean in and Keating hovers over Cameron’s shoulder.

KEATING (whispering in a gruff voice): “Carpe.”

Cameron looks over his shoulder with an aggravated expression on his face.

KEATING: “Hear it?” (whispering again) “Carpe. Carpe Diem. Seize the day boys, make your lives extraordinary.”

The boys stare at the faces in the cabinet in silence.

Decades from now there will be another young man at Williams who will walk down those halls on his way to practice. Perhaps he will play squash like TB Jones and I did (although I hope that he plays more like TB than like me). Whatever his future might hold, I hope that he sees our pictures and wonders about us, about where we went from Williams and how prepared we were for the journey. I hope that he realizes how fortunate he is.

Does football coach Aaron Kelton remind his players of the history of those who have gone before? Does he know their names and their stories?

I hope so.

Williams may win or lose tomorrow. Given the fact that the team has struggled the last few years, that the seniors have lost this game every year that they have been at Williams and that Amherst comes into the game undefeated, a victory tomorrow would be one of the sweetest in decades, all the more so because no (?) neutral observer gives Williams any chance at all.

Did Frank Uible ’57 win or lose the games he played against Amherst more than 50 year ago? In the longer sweep of history, one game, one loss, is as dust in the corridors of memory. What matters is the day itself, and the place we each occupy within the traditions of the Williams community.

No one remembers the score of the game these men played 100 years ago. But we look in their faces and see ourselves.

I am Frank Uible ’57. Who are you?

[Thanks to EphBlog regular “nuts” and Williams Sports Information for the photos. Note that the original post in this series did not include a YouTube clip because YouTube did not exist. Old Time is still a-flying.]

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A Glimpse of Homecoming ’72

Homecoming 2015 is this weekend, marking the first visit by Amherst to the new Farley-Lamb Field. In the Williams of today, I hope there’s no need for advertisements like the top right one, published in the Williams RecordAdvocate during Homecoming Week in 1972:

RecordAdvocatead
1972 was still early in the coed transition at Williams, with the first female graduates walking the stage in 1971. Women would have been concentrated in the underclasses, making up about one-quarter of the freshmen and sophomore classes, and a lower proportion of the student body as a whole.

Do we have any readers who remember this ad (or maybe even someone on the “Ad Hoc Committee to promote social interaction”, and the social sense that triggered it? Perhaps dating patterns for Williams men were changing too sluggishly to accommodate the influx of women?

Eph men who got to know the first-year women of the class of 1972 met some remarkable (and lovely) Eph women. Among them, Susan Schwab ’76 and Carla Craig ’76, pictured below in the 1976 Gulielmensian.

Craig-Schwab

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How Many More Football Games at Weston?

Today is Homecoming. Good luck to all the Eph Sports teams!

But what is the future of football at Williams?

time_football

Four years ago, I asked:

How many more football games will be played at Williams? I would put the over/under at 40. In other words, don’t be surprised if football is no longer played at the College by 2020.

That prediction was met with derision. Would anyone take the bet today?

Much of my reasoning is the same now as it was then.

1) Ending football at Williams (and other NESCAC schools) is a completely different bucket of concussions that ending football at the University of Washington or other Division I schools. I don’t expect college football to disappear from such places for decades, if ever.

2) The presidents and faculty of NESCAC schools are, as a rule, not fans of football as a sport, which is one reason Connecticut College does not have a team. Football is expensive. Football requires huge amounts of admissions concessions and, because of that, football players are much more likely to have academic and honor code difficulties.

3) Football can be eliminated from an elite school with no ill effects, as Swarthmore demonstrated a decade ago.

The biggest change in the last four years is the near universal agreement that football is dangerous. Even the NFL agrees! And that means that the liability picture, for Williams, has changed dramatically.

Imagine a lawsuit by a former Williams football player a decade from now, someone suffering significant mental impairment from football. Imagine the depositions and discovery process. Could President Falk deny that he knew that football was dangerous? Could Trustee Jonathan Kraft ’86 (COO of the New England Patriots) pretend that he did not agree with the NFL’s decision to settle lawsuits from former players?

But this is a risk for all colleges. And a reasonable defense might be that the student knew the risks and took them willingly. The problem that Williams faces is that the vast majority of starting football players would not have been admitted to Williams if they did not play football. Williams did not admit them and then offer them the choice of participating or not in this risky activity. Williams only admitted them if they agreed, implicitly or otherwise, to engage in this risky activity. And that fact changes the liability picture significantly. (Contrary opinions from our lawyer readers are welcome.)

So, enjoy today’s football game at Weston. There are no more than 20 such games left to be played . . .

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Williams Privilege

A homecoming discussion on WSO:

Today, while on the phone with my friends and trying to locate them in the crowd, I happened to end up standing in front of a red GMC SUV that was parked behind the goalposts closest to the street. As I did so, the driver of the vehicle stepped out of the car and approached me.

“Excuse me,” he said, “my wife’s recovering from surgery and you’re blocking her view.”

“Oh,” I said, trying to listen to the phone and this guy at the same time. “I’ll move – give me two minutes.”

He paused for a second, and then started jabbing his finger at me. “If you don’t move right now,” he said, “I’m gonna throw your little ass over this fence here.”

This, of course, got my attention. Several more minutes of heated argument followed, in which the man (who I’m assuming is an alum) repeated multiple times that I was the problem and that I was a jerk for not immediately deferring to his request.

Read the whole thing. Maybe it is just a white thing, but if someone asked me to move because I was blocking the view of someone disabled (someone who had been there before I arrived), I would just move.

Sure, he might’ve just been a total asshole to everybody, or maybe I was actually being a jerk by standing in his wife’s field of vision accidentally for a minute, but I can’t shake the feeling that my race had a lot to do with the way he felt he could treat me.

Assuming (with zero evidence) that your race plays a major role in interactions at a Williams homecoming is, uh, an interesting approach to life . . .

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Homecoming

1) Williams football is crushing Welseyan, 45-7 in the third quarter. Live video here.

2) Happy Birthday to former Eph football coach Mike Whalen. As always, player ability matters more than coaching ability.

3) How many people are watching the game? (Define “watching” as viewing at least 20 plays. So, going in and out from the tailgate area still qualified, but just hanging out there does not.) The video has scanned the Eph stands a few times. I would guess 1,000. The announcers refer to a “capacity crowd.” What would you guess?

4) Did Williams/Wesleyan perform a thank-the-military ceremony like Williams/Amherst did last year?

5) Harry Sheehy is at the game! Say Hi to him from EphBlog.

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Homecoming

Here (doc) is the back story on the veteran’s ceremony before the start of the homecoming football game.

From the very beginning, as two of the nations oldest and most established places of higher learning, we have always been linked to the ideal of service above self. For Williams, our benefactorʼs first gift of a bit over $11,000 helped to eventually create both of these beacons of progressive thought in the mountains and valleys of the Commonwealth. Both colleges have always been tied together in force of spirit and competition and this November we hope we can gather for just a few minutes to remember the sacrifices of so many, who are also linked through their service to the nation. We think many in the stands; alumni, students and family will be surprised by the numbers within our ranks who have served our nation in uniform, and hopefully, for just a moment, be humbled by that unified sacrifice. While this fall our teams gather, once again, on the fields of friendly strife as they have done for one hundred and twenty-four years; our hope is – that this year, we take the time to honor those who have walked fields less friendly, in the past – and indeed – today around the globe, and simply say – Thank You.

Kudos to Sean Crotty ’84 and Paul Rieckhoff (Amherst Class of 1998) for arranging this event. Did anyone see it? How did it work out? I hope that this becomes an annual tradition. Which Williams officials supported this idea? Kudos to them as well.

My thoughts on Ephs and military service here.

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Gondo and the Game: The face tells all …

Port Amherst 2009

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Photos of Homecoming

Some great pictures from the Amherst College flickr account. Click on the little box in the lower right corner for full screen.

And here are some photos from the Williams Athletics site. Thanks to David for pointing them out.

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Homecoming liveblog/discussion

Make sure to read the preview here

Sports Updates: http://bit.ly/11JIhk #fb
3:51 PM Nov 15th from WP to Twitter

:( (nice photo, btw) RT @JefferyAmherst Well these gentlemen certainly seem happy http://bit.ly/2lWP9S #amhwil
8:27 PM Nov 14th from web

Yard By Yard http://bit.ly/4e77Z1 #fb
3:47 PM Nov 14th from twitterfeed

moo-cow band plays The Mountains
3:18 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

And its over. Amherst wins, 26-21
3:18 PM Nov 14th from txt

amherst rushes the field; perfect 8-0 for them
3:17 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

game over; amherst in victory formation
3:16 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

Crowd has gone very quiet
3:16 PM Nov 14th from txt

sure do wish we had those two time outs now
3:16 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

how can you throw the ball short of the first down?
3:15 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

amherst holds;great tackle by govey
3:14 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

annoucers think pass by moffit
3:14 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

26-21; williams must get touchdown
3:13 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

williams calls timeout?
3:13 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

4th and long 3; need to get to 19
3:12 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

amherst calls time out
3:12 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

what wll ehs call?
3:12 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

4th and 3; less than a minute; key play
3:12 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

After 4th down, Ephs have the ball, 8:19 left in the game, 5 points behind (26-21)
2:59 PM Nov 14th from txt

Amherst QB Vetras is sacked
2:57 PM Nov 14th from txt

And the kick is good. Amherst 26, Williams 21
2:51 PM Nov 14th from txt

26-21; williams behind by 5 with 10 minutes left
2:51 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

touchdown by ephs! quarterback draw by moffitt
2:50 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

Touchdown Ephs!
2:50 PM Nov 14th from txt

timeout by williams; might wish that we had that one back later in the game
2:49 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

yes! pass successful; 1st and goal on the 4
2:48 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

ephs to go on 4th and 3
2:47 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

3rd and 6 wih coyne at qb
2:47 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

if amherst loses this game, it will be one of the great collapses in the history of the rivalry
2:47 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

ephs are driving
2:46 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

1st down and dangerous pass to jamall jefferson
2:45 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

pass tipped on first down; moffit in as qb; williams has done almost nothing on offense since last score
2:44 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

13 minutes left; down by 12; against number one defense in nescac
2:43 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

Amherst TD. They lead 26-14
2:42 PM Nov 14th from txt

amherst goes for 2; fails; williams down by 12; looking bleak
2:41 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

amherst touchdown! ball went right threw williams defenders hands; crushing blow
2:40 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

huge pass play by amherst
2:39 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

2nd and 15 for amherst; williams needs another stop; how many interceptions can we throw and win?
2:38 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

amherst has ball at their own 40 (interception was a long pass); 2nd and ten; timeout amherst
2:37 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

interception by amherst! williams receiver seemed to have it at least as well
2:35 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

earlier in game, announcers mentioned two ephs heading to war; one was Trevor Powers ’09; who was the other? class of ’07; jordan something?
2:35 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

End of the third quarter. Amherst 20, Williams 14
2:32 PM Nov 14th from txt

moffit back at qb; running game is not working; end of 3rd quarter
2:31 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

field goal misses; “Williams dodges a bullet”
2:30 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

would make it two score game
2:30 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

4th and 3; field goal attempt coming
2:30 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

incomplete; 3d and 10
2:29 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

2nd and 10; ball at williams 26
2:29 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

amherst gets first down on 3rd and long; critical that ephs get a stop
2:28 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

announcers question decision to use coyne instead of moffit at qb outside redzone
2:28 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

eph receiver needs to come back for the bal
2:26 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

interception by amherst
2:25 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

Field goal by Amherst on fourth down, after two attempted TD passes fell incomplete. Amherst leads 20-14 with 2:36 left in the 3rd quarter
2:24 PM Nov 14th from txt

amherst ahead by 6
2:24 PM Nov 14th from TwitterBar

Second half starts with a first down for the Ephs
1:57 PM Nov 14th from txt

And the first half comes to an end with amherst ahead 17-14
1:34 PM Nov 14th from txt

Correction: amherst leads 17-14
1:22 PM Nov 14th from txt

Amherst scores a TD, and the kick is good. The Herst leads, 16-10. The playing field is getting pretty slippery.
1:21 PM Nov 14th from txt

Touchdown for the herst, kick for the extra point is good. 14-10
1:08 PM Nov 14th from txt

And the conversion is good. 14-3
12:49 PM Nov 14th from txt

Ephs TD!
12:48 PM Nov 14th from txt

Second quarter starts with a quick first down for the Ephs
12:48 PM Nov 14th from txt

End of first quarter with Williams leading Amherst 7-3
12:45 PM Nov 14th from txt

In other news, the women’s soccer team leads 5-0, the men’s soccer team leads 3-0
12:42 PM Nov 14th from txt

Ephs TD! And the conversion is good. 7-3
12:26 PM Nov 14th from txt

1st down for the Ephs
12:23 PM Nov 14th from txt

Amherst scores a field goal. 3-0
12:18 PM Nov 14th from txt

Kickoff
12:10 PM Nov 14th from txt

Homecoming liveblog/discussion http://bit.ly/1lP5c #fb
11:47 AM Nov 14th from twitterfeed

GO EPHS!
10:47 AM Nov 14th from txt

Biggest Little Game Preview http://bit.ly/2IIj8R #fb
3:17 PM Nov 13th from twitterfeed

Our homecoming preview: http://bit.ly/4fXl2P
3:11 PM Nov 13th from web

We plan to liveblog and post game updates on Twitter RT @ChipNCharge @EphSports Will there be any score updates on Twitter?
2:29 PM Nov 13th from web

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Biggest Little Game Preview

I imagine most folks will be watching the HUGE Amherst-Williams football game on Saturday at bars or in person, but just in case, we will be liveblogging and live-tweeting the game (as well as the other NCAA contests this weekend, which is one of the most action-packed, from a sports perspective, in recent Williams history). A liveblog/discussion post will go up tomorrow morning. It would also be fun if folks would post descriptions of scenes, or better yet photos, from the bars where they are watching! If you won’t be on campus, remember to check here for telecast locations near you or tune into NESN on DISH Network or DirecTV. Now on to the preview.

The starting point for those new to the rivalry should, of course, be 2007’s amazing College GameDay broadcast. This older thread contains a lot of links about the rivalry, many of which are still valid. Some of the highlights include ESPN.com stories from 2007 and 2000, as well as this 2007 column by ESPN’s Chris Fowler. Also be sure to bone up on The Walk, the best post-game football tradition in the country.

Williams previews the game here, Amherst previews it here, the Berkshire Eagle here, MassLive here. Eph football video shows can be found here.  Additional late-breaking previews: North Adams Transcript, Berkshire Eagle parts one and two.    

This game is one of the biggest games of the last 30 years for Amherst: it represents a chance to go to 8-0 for the first time in decades; a chance to beat Williams for the first time in any current player’s time on campus; and a chance to beat Williams on Weston Field for the first time since, incredibly, 1985. If Amherst loses, on the other hand, an amazing 7-0 season will suddenly feel hollow, having to “share” (but of course it won’t feel like sharing) the NESCAC crown with their hated rival. To say that the Jeffs will be extremely fired up is the understatement of the year. Of course, the Ephs don’t want to be the group to lose the home winning streak, or be the first group of guys to be unable to “walk” since 1995 (and in some sense, that group got a pass as they were forced to compete on a basically unplayable Weston Field), so they will be equally fired-up.

Williams vs. Amherst represents the immovable force vs. the unstoppable object.  Amherst is ranked first in New England, Williams second. Williams has the top scoring offense in the league; Amherst has the top defense. Williams excels at protecting the quarterback; Amherst has the most sack-happy defense NESCAC has seen in ages. Williams leads the conference in rushing by a wide margin; Amherst did the same, for rushing defense. The other side of the ball should be equally interesting. Williams’ defense and Amherst’s offense were inconsistently early in the season, but both have really excelled over the last few weeks. Williams, in particular, has improved as some of its injured players have returned to health.

Key players for the game: Williams has gotten big plays on defense this year from reigning NESCAC player of the week Matt Zanedis ’09, Dan Canina ’12, Mt. Greylock alum Dylan Schultz ’12, and future star Chris Cameron ’13, who along with Amherst’s Sam Clark ’13 is vying for honors as the top frosh defender in the league. Amherst thrives on a collection of fast, athletic pass rushers / run stoppers up front, including returning first team all-conference defensive ends Eric Pender ’10 and Edwin Urey ’10; lightning-quick back-up Kevin Ferber ’12, 24-year-old D-I transfer and former pro baseball player Jeff Katz ’11, (all of whom are among the league leaders in sacks and tackles for losses) and leading tackler Mike Taylor ’10. Amherst has a very experienced secondary, featuring three senior starters led by NESCAC interception leader Fred Argir ’10, but teams have had more success passing than running this year against the ‘Hurst.

On offense, Williams relies on a steady ground game from NESCAC rushing leader Ryan Lupo ’11 and an experienced offensive line (three senior starters), complemented by a dual-quarterback attack of passing threat Pat Moffitt ’11 and running threat Matt Coyne ’12 (the latter of whom is almost guaranteed to be involved in some sort of trick play this game). Moffitt and Coyne have two large targets in J.C. Stickney ’12 (emerging as the next superstar receiver at Williams) and captain / inspirational leader Nick Caro ’10 [this just in: Caro will not play due to injury, a big loss for the Ephs]. The X-factor / big-play guy for the Ephs is super-speedy “slash” Bryce Bennett ’11, who came into Williams as a quarterback and is now a KR/WR/RB/QB. The Ephs will need at least one big play from Bennett to beat the ‘Hurst. Amherst’s rushing attack has been uncharacteristically ineffective this year, but they’ve compensated with an offense that can throw to a deep stable of fast and tall receivers. They are so deep at that position that you really can’t key on any one guy, but speedster Andre Gary ’11 gave the Ephs fits last year, Brandon Bullock ’10 has big play capability as well, and twins Andrew and Will Reed ’12 have both emerged as go-to players in recent weeks. Amherst’s QB duo mirrors that of the Ephs, as they also start an experienced junior (Alex Vetras ’11) who handles the bulk of the passing duties, along with a mobile sophomore (Brian McMahon ’12) who provides a spark off the bench.

If the Ephs have an edge other than at running back, it is on special teams, where Williams has the best kicker (Scott Sobolewski ’10) and punter (Will Cronin ’10) in NESCAC. For Williams to win, it will have to turn the game into a physical battle up front to gradually wear down Amherst’s smaller, faster front seven, shut down Amherst’s running attack completely so they are forced to be one-dimensional on offense, and win the field position battle behind its experienced kickers. Go Ephs!

Miscellaneous game notes:

  • New England legend Doug Flutie will be the color man for the game. Speaking of local legends, one name on the Amherst roster that will be familiar to New England football die-hards is special teams ace Gordie Lockbaum, son of the Holy Cross legend and former Heisman candidate.
  • NESN has an interview with Eph coach Mike Whalen here.
  • Check out this great story on Dave “The Tank” Shawan ’72, creator of “The Walk”

    The Walk in 1971. Photo by Gregg Peterson.

    The Walk in 1971. Photo by Gregg Peterson.

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Heck of a Weekend at Williams …

Whether you are an alumnus in town for the big game, or an undergrad looking for ways to distract yourself from approaching finals, this weekend should be a fun one on and around campus.  One suggested itinerary:

  • Thursday night, check out jazz/funk legends Medeski Martin & Wood at MassMoca.
  • Friday night, check out one of Eph Stephen Sondheim’s best musicals, Company, at the ’62 Center Mainstage.
  • Saturday morning, catch the first half of the women’s soccer NCAA contest before sprinting over to Weston Field for the Amherst game.  More info on Homecoming events here.
  • Saturday night, don’t miss the Octet’s 35th Reunion Concert, featuring tons of Octet alumni making it back to campus to perform.
  • Sunday morning, depending on Saturday’s results, make the 45 minute drive to Troy to support men’s soccer against host RPI in NCAA action, or head down to Cole Field to catch the women in second round action.  (Alums pay special heed to this one — Troy is on the way home for anyone from the NYC area crashing in Williamstown Saturday night!).
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Telecast map for homecoming

Thanks to the Alumni Office for putting together this compendium of telecast locations for the homecoming game:


View Williams Football Telecasts 2009 in a larger map

(if you drag the map around, you’ll see that there are locations in Japan, Hawaii, and the UK)

Go here to view more details about on-campus celebrations as well as a telecast directory (use the dropdown menu towards the bottom of the page to find your town).

(h/t Juan Baena ’06)

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